False Things People Believe About US History

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Since the 2016 election the media has harped on the phantom problem of “fake news,” and Facebook and Google have determined to crack down on it.

If you ask me, most of the “fake news” comes from the major networks and newspapers.

And most of the fake history is taught in our classrooms.

Here we are on Thanksgiving vacation, for example, and few people realize why things were so bad in Plymouth colony during the first couple of years of its existence such that abundance would be such a cause for celebration.

The initial policy was that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, traffic, trucking, working, fishing, or any other means” would be collected into a common stock, and “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” The Politically Incorr... Thomas E. Woods Jr. Best Price: $1.98 Buy New $9.10 (as of 12:05 EDT - Details)

So no connection between effort and reward.

William Bradford, the colony’s second governor, further noted that the strongest and most fit young men had begun to complain about having to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.”

Once these rules were abolished and people could keep the fruits of what they produced on their private plots, the problem went away.

Beyond Thanksgiving, I would guess a majority of Americans believe at least one, and probably far more than one, of the standard myths peddled in typical classrooms — e.g., the Great Depression was cured by government spending, the great entrepreneurs of the 19th century gouged consumers, or racial and gender differences in income must be explained by “discrimination.”

Trust me, I could go on. You could probably add a bunch of your own.

It reminds me of what Thomas Jefferson once said about newspapers: people who read nothing at all are more informed than people who get their information from newspapers.

Change “newspapers” to “universities,” and at least in some fields, we may not be far from the truth. Real Dissent: A Libert... Thomas E. Woods Jr. Check Amazon for Pricing.

Don’t get me wrong: I learned a lot of good stuff in college. But I had to avoid certain faculty members altogether, and I sure as heck had to do a lot of reading on my own.

Not to mention there was plenty of social pressure to think a certain way — even about history, which you’d think would be based more or less on objective fact.

Solution: my dashboard university, Liberty Classroom.

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