Why the Sun Shines on Summer Babies Ultraviolet rays make pregnant women have taller offspring with stronger bones

Women who are pregnant during the summer have taller, stronger-boned babies because they benefit from the sun’s vitamin-boosting rays, a study suggested yesterday.

Children born in late summer or early autumn are about 5mm taller and have thicker bones than those born in winter or spring, an 18-year research project found.

Women lucky enough to be blooming in hotter months should get enough sun to boost their vitamin D levels just by walking around outside or even sunbathing. But those pregnant over winter should consider taking vitamin supplements, researchers at Bristol University recommended.

Anyone thinking of trying to short-cut the process by sitting on a sunbed in the final weeks of pregnancy would do themselves no good. Sunbeds emit mainly UVA light, whereas natural UVB rays from the sun trigger vitamin D production. Sunbed users also face well-publicised risks. Sally Watson, a spokeswoman for the study, said: "Perhaps people should not be quite so terrified of the sun. There has been a lot of panic about skin cancer but people do not need to panic about the odd few minutes of exposure. A little controlled English sun is better than none."

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James Woodward writes for the The Independent (UK).