• Anti-Viral, Anti-Fungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Oxidant Powerhouse Olive Leaf

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    (NaturalNews)
    The healing benefits of olive leaf has been used for thousands of
    years and originated in Ancient Egypt. The olive leaf was used by
    many as a sign of heavenly power. In the 1850`s, there is documentation
    showing how olive leaf cured malaria in its final stages.

    If you live
    a stressful life and you normally get colds and flu, then olive
    leaf is just what you need. Many have had great success with this
    herb. Olive leaf has a bitter compound called oleuropein, which
    is the reason for its disease fighting compound.

    Olive leaf
    through many trials has shown its ability to fight any and all attacking
    viruses. Olive leaf has anti-viral, anti-fungal and anti-inflammatory
    properties. It has 400 percent more antioxidants than Vitamin C
    and double the antioxidants of green tea. Olive leaf should be taken
    daily to achieve the maximum effect.

    Olive Leaf
    benefits:

    • Traditionally
      used to fight off colds and the flu.

    • Treating
      yeast infections
    • Viral infections,
      Epstein Barr, shingles and herpes
    • Heart conditions
    • Lowering
      cholesterol and LDL levels

    How to prepare
    the olive leaves:

    1. Remove
      the fresh leaves and wash them and air dry.
    2. Place them
      on a large tray to dry or on a large screen. Dry them in your
      home, in front of a large window, where there is plenty of sun.
      You can also place the leaves on a huge blanket to dry. This will
      take several days.
    3. After the
      leaves are completely dried and very brittle, store in large glass
      containers. Take a small amount and place in a coffee grinder
      and grind to a fine pulp.
    4. Place in
      vegetarian capsules, as needed. If the consistency is difficult
      to place in capsules, you can add some ground fennel or grape
      seeds and mix with the ground olive leaves.

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    the rest of the article

    September
    3, 2009

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