Gods and Generals

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At
the end, I could weep no more.

I
do not know how the eight others in the audience felt. I know that
if I had seen "Gods and Generals" without first having
read Thomas
DiLorenzo's important works

or Charles
Adam's book
, I would not have grieved so greatly. It would have
been just another war film with conflicting opinions. "Maybe
there can be two right sides," my pre-LRC mind might have concluded.

But
LRC readers know the truth. The War Between the States was not necessary.
The carnage at Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and other
hallowed ground was in vain. As Charles Adams points out, even European
newspaper editors saw through Lincoln's naked aggression. Union
armies crossed the Rubicon and did indeed lead to the fall of the
Republic.

I
imagine this will be the last week in the theaters for "Gods
and Generals." If you do not see the carnage, the Christian
conviction of Gen. Stonewall Jackson, and the horror of war on the
big screen you will miss forever the full effect of this cinematic
masterpiece.

Ron
Maxwell, the film's writer, director, and producer, stated, “The
suffering was beyond our reckoning. … The last thing the world needs
is a mindless, glossy entertainment on the Civil War. None of us
want that, so it is important to accept the seriousness of this
challenge: to keep our eyes wide open, to be relentlessly honest,
to refrain from perpetuating myth and folklore — to get to the truth
of the matter. Nothing will be more dramatic and nothing will be
more worthwhile.”

What
action will come from having seen the film? What
will you learn when you turn off the TV

permanently? To shoot a rifle? To administer first aid and last
rites? Will you study the arguments for the advantages of liberty,
hard money, and states' rights? Will you urge your local elementary
school to stop indoctrinating the halflings with the myth of Lincoln?
(At the very least stop holding him up with George Washington.)
Will you donate DiLorenzo's
tome
to the library and raise a stink when
they refuse to shelve it?

An
evening this week at the theater for 20 depreciating federal reserve
notes is a small sacrifice compared to taking a .58 caliber Minnie-ball
in the chest defending your home and hearth. The popcorn salt will
indeed sting when brushing away your tears, but we all need to be
reminded of the great cost of liberty.

One
last minor point: Where are they raising the Union brigades to free
the Christian slaves that exist today in Sudan? If it helps, I would
be glad to assert there is oil somewhere over there.

March
17, 2003

Brian
Heyer [send him mail]
is a CPA who lives too close to Milwaukee, Wisc. with his wife,
two daughters, and a son, Jefferson, who is named after two American
presidents.


     

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