The Disaster of Government Schools

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Have
any of you noticed that:

To excel in math, one must learn multiplication tables by rote memory.
Only then, after exercising that memorized knowledge for a time
period, can an understanding of math's "whys" come later.
To excel in reading, rote memorization is NOT a workable approach;
instead of memorizing letter patterns, one must learn to read phonetically
by spelling out the words. What works for math has the opposite
effect when learning to read.

The government schools, in their continuous attempt to thwart children's
educations, do exactly the opposite of what works. The government
schools, with your tax money, now discourage the teaching of multiplication
tables by rote memorization but teach reading by the "look-and-say"
method which is memorization of spelling patterns. In doing so,
they ensure that children will neither be able to read nor calculate.

The government school system, with a sneaky and typically always
unknown accomplice named Hollywood (some won't understand why I
say Hollywood is the government schools' accomplice), often produce
many young graduates who are little more than HYPER-HORMONAL THUGS
WHO CANNOT READ OR SPELL.

We've had a decade of economic prosperity. Several things are converging
to help ensure that prosperity will NOT continue:

  • Fuel
    prices are high
  • A
    recession will surely hit if it has not began already
  • The
    American investment economy has lost billions in market capitalization
    within the past 12 months
  • And,
    I believe, that we reached a critical mass of government-schooled
    ignorants about 4 years ago and they are now entering the lower
    echelons of the corporate workplace.

Until now, this critical mass of a government-trained negative workforce
has not hit the major economy because so many graduates of our recent
schools worked in industries such as fast-food and similar places.
Such businesses have more flexibility with employees who have no
training in critical-thinking skills and no fundamental education.

How has MacDonalds been able to sustain their growth these past
4 years or so given that their labor pool contains so many of these
graduates? Technology has held off the decline. By putting pictures
of items on the cash registers and by putting mammoth keyboards
of buttons on these registers that handle every possible occurrence,
the fast-food industry helped delay the impact of employees who
cannot make change and who cannot get orders correct without these
advanced smart registers. Other industries with a high degree of
entry-level workers, such as grocery and discount stores, also use
technology to help level the lower-than-normal entry workers.

We've just recently surpassed the critical mass where society's
mechanisms will not be able to reverse the massive amount of negative
education that government school graduates are now getting.

I have noticed that, in the past several months, more and more service-related
tasks such as getting our car repaired or getting a correct order
at a drive-through or getting a repair done properly at home, almost
always now takes one return visit to "get it right." We
must now begin to expect this "double-take" if we are
going to survive with our sanity intact. We must expect that our
orders will typically be incorrect, that our repairs will require
a follow-up visit, and that the items we buy will more likely have
defects than they would have a few years ago. Then, things will
continue to get worse as the critical mass continues to grow. Fortunately,
we are now about to enter the second generation of homeschooled
students. Within another two generations, the sheer number of homeschooled
children will begin to reverse the effects we are now seeing. Unfortunately,
America will have a huge void to reverse at that point and it's
much more difficult to get a drop of oil out of a bucket of water
than it was to put it in.

January
8, 2001

Greg
Perry is the author of 65
books on computer programming
.

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