Global Gold Talks to Godfrey Bloom

Before becoming a politician, Godfrey Bloom worked for 35 years in finance and investment management. Discontent with over-regulation of this sector, he entered the world of politics in 2004, as a Member of the European Parliament. Bloom started as a representative for the UK Independence Party until 2013, then as an independent MEP. He is known as a fierce libertarian and a firm opponent of government regulation and centralization. Bloom is widely known as a Eurosceptic and now heavily involved in the Brexit’s “Leave Campaign” as an independent activist. He is also a good friend of the Mises Institute Europe. In recognition of Mr. Bloom’s role at such a decisive moment in the history of the UK, President of the Mises Institute, Jeff Deist, had the following words to say about Mr. Bloom:

“It’s great to see Mr. Bloom, along with other current and former MEPs, reading and quoting Mises and Rothbard as antidotes to the illiberal globalist European project. Mises understood the vital importance of self-determination, and surely this is the animating force behind the Brexit movement.”

Claudio Grass, Global Gold: Mr. Bloom, it is a pleasure to have the opportunity to speak with you. We understand that it is crunch time now with the Brexit referendum only ten days away. Britain joined a free trade deal with Europe in 1975 and finds itself now a member of a union of states. Why and how did that happen, in your opinion? What were the UK’s objectives and what was actually achieved?

Godfrey Bloom: I voted to join what I thought was a free trade zone in 1975; indeed it was called “the Common Market” on the ballot paper. It now transpires that a federal superstate was the ultimate goal. We were warned of this by some politicians at the time, but neither I nor most of the public took heed. Back in the seventies, we still vaguely believed our politicians told the truth. We had faith in our Prime Ministers, even though that might sound a bit naive today. It is also worth remembering Great Britain back then was at a low point in its historical trajectory, the lowest since the thirties and we were desperate.

Self-government has been salami-sliced away year by year. Neither the press nor media ever covered this aspect of the EU and its voracious central-planning ambitions. Public sector news broadcasting has been totally corrupted. It is still corrupt and biased even in the coverage of the referendum campaign. It goes to show, the establishment has a grip of steel over every aspect of our lives.

Global Gold: You are a very vocal speaker in favor of Brexit and a previous member of the European parliament for 10 years. At what point did you realize that the United Kingdom’s membership in the Union comes at the expense of its sovereignty and democratic values?

Godfrey Bloom: It was in the mid-eighties, when a family member, who was a butcher had to spend £20k to comply with an EU directive of the most absurd nature. With no recourse to his member of parliament, this began a long series of blatant infringements of the most basic of democratic rights.

EU overreach and infringement of national and individual rights have continued unabated for twenty years. The British people have been slow to wake up to this reality, as a direct result of corrupt public service broadcasting and a systematic dumbing down of the education system.

Would you believe the principles of English law are not taught in schools today; not even our system of government or the English Bill of Rights. It is so easy to steal from people something that they did not know they had in the first place.

Global Gold: In the 1990s you predicted the failure of the Euro over a ten-year period. Could you explain the factors that led to this? Where do you see the Euro is heading?

Godfrey Bloom: I was managing a very successful fixed interest fund in the late 1980s and early ’90s. Of course, fixed interest was very unfashionable at the time, but I was briefed by my employers to examine the implications of a common currency. I had some of the top city analysts and statisticians at my disposal. I also had two months to produce my findings… it was all over in a week! The whole concept was flawed: we saw there could be no common fiscal policy or lender of last resort, nor was there any democratic mandate. We simply did not continue the project.

In the mid-1990s, I was a guest lecturer at Cambridge University, explaining how it was bound to fail and in what manner and timescale. Cambridge academics are pretending now they envisaged failure because of these flaws. They didn’t. I was regarded as an eccentric, even though amusing, speaker and I was really thought to be away with the fairies. The rest, as they say, is history.

Read the Whole Article