The Grand Illusion

Modern Reality: Is It All A Contrived Illusion?

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Government propaganda is one thing, but what is going on in the world today goes far beyond anything even George Orwell might have imagined in his book “1984.”

I’ve written about government propaganda events before at LewRockwell.com.  An example was my article entitled “Remember the Maine,” how the U.S. government triggered all of its modern wars by contrived or permitted attacks on British or US boats (battleship USS Maine, RMS Lusitania, Pearl Harbor, Gulf of Tonkin incident) in port or at sea.

Another example is the article I wrote about the complicity of the Hollywood film industry in producing timely films to advance war or other social agendas of government.

But here today I am writing about something far broader, something more pervasive, something more mind-controlling.

I am writing about a larger grand scheme to alter the American experience, the very everyday realities Americans use to interpret current events and to develop their world view, in essence, the totality of experiences that comprise the closely-held ideas that become the very internal fabric of each and every American.

What if most of our closely held beliefs, not only about our country, but about health, medicine, biology, money, finance, space and time, energy resources, even our expectations on how long we will live and our interpretations about past, present and future events, are built upon staged or fabricated events and information?

The unreality industry

In 1989 a couple of business school professors wrote a book (The Unreality Industry, 1993) explaining how humans tend to accept the false realities created by television as long as they fit their preconceived idea of what the world is about.  These professors described a giant morality play that America has doled out to its citizens via television.  They described a heroless and leaderless society where “great leaders” are created electronically and are considered great by their position rather than their accomplishments.

As an aside, they assailed the manufacturing of celebrity that has morphed into what we see today – Paris Hilton.  She is not a singer, nor actor, nor entertainer of any sort.  Just a celebrity.  Is this what American should kids aspire to be, now that there are no jobs?

Contrived realities with political objectives

Some modern-day events appear to be contrived and have obvious political purposes.  For example, the alleged gassing of women and children in Syria, the most recent example, is paraded in news report around the globe.

But visual inspection reveals photos of shrouded dead people with fully pink faces, which suggests blood circulation, not the absence of it.  Every dead person’s eyes are closed, yet the dead often have a fixed open-eyed stare.  A “fixed and dilated pupil” of an eye is shown as evidence of death, but the pupil is not fully dilated.  The hands of the dead are crossed over their chests and some actually have their fingers laced together.  This is not characteristic of dead bodies where rigor mortis has set in.  This event appears to be staged and the news media is complicit in airing it without a critical eye.

But modern unrealities extend beyond obvious political objectives.  More pervasively, these created realities reach into deeper portions of our minds and lives.  Every-day practiced unrealities, involving money and health, cement falsehoods into our lives and breed a mindset that accepts other unrealities.

What is reality?

According to the Compact Oxford English Dictionary of Current English, Oxford University Press (2005), reality is the state of things as they actually exist, rather than as they may appear or might be imagined.

It is said that reality is the totality of all things, structures (actual and conceptual), events (past and present) and phenomena, whether observable or not. It is what a world view (whether it be based on individual or shared human experience) ultimately attempts to describe or map.

Not only events, but ideas also shape reality.  Certain ideas from physics, philosophy, sociology and religion shape various theories of reality.

Basically we create our own reality or world view.  God is or isn’t.  Darwinian evolution is or isn’t the best explanation of where life came from.

From that world view is how humans accept or reject information they are confronted with.  If that information does not fit a particular world view, it is initially rejected, even if it is obvious and observed.

When science doesn’t agree with the reigning world view, such as when scientists believed the Earth was flat, those who held to the idea it was a sphere were expelled, persecuted or executed in what became the infamous inquisitions of Europe beginning in the 1400s.

Today America is more fascist than democratic.  There is an evil allegiance between industry and government.  Government may issue mandates that subjugate the population to an unreality.  For example, the mandate that all school children must be vaccinated prior to admission to school in order to protect them from infection and death.   Yet season of the year (winter) and geography (northern latitude) rather than vaccination rates appear to be larger factors in regard to infectious disease.  Little is done to boost immunity (vitamin therapy) as there is total reliance upon vaccination to quell infectious disease.

Past versus present unrealities

I’ve conducted cursory investigation into questions that involve history, pre-history and cosmology, biology and geology.  Questions like:  Did the US fight the Civil War over the issue of slavery?  Did the universe begin with The Big Bang?  Did humans really emanate from a monkey-like common ancestor?  Is there only a limited supply of oil in the world? And, to drag another old contention out of the archives of skepticism, did America really land astronauts on the surface of the moon?

Each of the above topics I’ve addressed briefly in the addendum that accompanies this report.

It is one thing to argue over the Big Bang origin of the universe, or to question whether evolution is real or not, or wonder whether oil is in limited supply because there were only so many dead dinosaurs to provide organic material to produce oil, or to cast a critical eye at the claim America landed astronauts on the moon in 1969.  But it is quite another thing to deal with current everyday false realities.

Everyday unrealities

Whether the US fought The Civil War over slavery or whether the universe started with The Big Bang, those are past realities that don’t involve daily life. Issues of health and money are present-day realities that are habitually employed.

I won’t dwell on these above-mentioned historical and scientific questions as they only serve as distractions to my main point, that every-day practiced falsehoods about health and money lull Americans into acceptance of virtually everything the State presents.

Today, in a political sense, those Americans who don’t embrace complete blind faith in American government are potential terrorists.  The President of the United States stands in Congress and asked Americans to decide: ”Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists.”

That deciding-point had a political objective.  Today any American who is skeptical of government and outspoken may be placed on a watch list by the Department of Homeland Security, and listened to by the National Security Administration.

But what of the person who is skeptical of the idea that cholesterol is the primary cause of heart disease?  What of the parent who even dare to pause over the onerous regimen of vaccines their child has to submit to?  What of the person who inquires about the true value of money?

These two issues involving money and health, used here for example, aren’t addressed in school, as they are accepted unquestionably.  Most people probably figure someone else must have checked into these matters before them.  So cholesterol is the primary reason why heart disease is the leading cause of death and Americans need not even ask how the value of the US Dollar is determined as it is “backed by the full faith and credit of the (bankrupt) US government.”

New generations embrace even more preposterous unrealities because the prior generation never questioned them.

When a population accepts every notion that it has been taught, this sets the tone for passive acceptance of almost everything that is doled out on television or in school textbooks.  To object or even begin to question is to run the risk of a modern day inquisition.

Cholesterol phobia may never be undone

How do we even go about confronting our doctors over the falsehood of cholesterol?

Despite the many incontrovertible scientific studies that show cholesterol is not the primary cause of death from coronary artery disease it remains the central theme of modern medicine.  An estimated 30 million Americans take statin cholesterol-lowering drugs.  Statins are a $30 billion cash cow for doctors and pharmaceutical companies.

Type-in “refuse statin drugs” on any web browser and see the many reports which substantiate the uselessness of statin drugs.  Yet millions of cholesterol-phobic Americans continue to take them.  When confronted over science that contradicts the use of these statin drugs, patients often say “but my doctor said I would die if I don’t take them.”  In the decision making process, fear trumps any science.

How do parents even dare question the reigning (false) paradigm that vaccines are responsible for much of the decline of disease in the modern era? (Click here to view charts showing infectious disease rates began to fall prior to the era of vaccines.)

Pediatricians are ready to report uncooperative parents to authorities if they aren’t submitting their children for 49 different rounds of needle jabs of 16 vaccines by the age of 18.  It is a modern repeat of the inquisition, just in a different form.

Why not “vitaminize” children and allow them to be exposed to the various circulating viruses and bacteria to develop natural immunity (antibodies) while supplemental vitamins normalize the immune response and quell symptoms of fever, rash and discomfort instead of intentionally injecting viruses or bacteria into children?

Omission as a way to non-educate

One way to pull a hoax over on a population is to never address an issue.  Kids in schools never learn much about money beyond counting it and spending it.  Just become a happy spender and use credit cards to perpetually live beyond your means, and live a lifestyle you haven’t earned.  In reality, that is what is being taught to American children.

I’ve addressed the many falsehoods that determine the perceived value of money in a prior column.  It is the nation’s central bank that deceptively encourages children and adults to save money so as to capitalize American banks almost for free (actually, at a loss).

For example, The Federal Reserve bank displays an online chart showing a $50/month savings plan for 30 years would rise to about $35,000 to $75,000 in value @ 4% and 8% rate of interest.

Of course, their chart does not present the current situation.  Interest rates on banked money today are less than 1%.  Inflation is not the 2.2% issued by the Federal Reserve, but rather ~9.6% (according to the way inflation was calculated prior to 1980).

So Americans are losing nearly 10% on the value of their banked money annually by placing it in the bank.  After taxes and loss of purchasing power due to inflation, most Americans would have lost money putting it in a savings account.

Americans have an estimated $8-13 trillion banked in long-term savings accounts.  How much money and wealth have Americans lost since interest rates don’t even approach the rate of inflation?  One expert estimates Americans have lost a whopping $10.8 trillion in earned interest usage since 2001.  That is a very harsh reality!

When the grand illusion stops

My son, then 8-years old, asked if he could buy an island, create his own country, then print his own money.  I responded, probably yes.  I informed him banknote companies can be readily retained to print the money. But I informed him that banknotes only represent something of value and need to be backed by something tangible.

He asked if the tomatoes in the kitchen would do.  I responded they would not be practical as they decay.  What is needed is something durable, portable, exchangeable, divisible, and intrinsically deemed valuable, I said.

He wanted to know if gold and silver (at the very least treasured by females for adornment) would meet these criteria.  At this point the illusion that paper money represents true wealth was revealed to him.

Maybe he will develop a skeptical mindset as he encounters other such questions in life.  I don’t want him to be a victim of the many fabrications in our modern world.  The grand illusion has to stop somewhere.

Sudden realization

When cholesterol-phobic Americans die of sudden-death heart attack, they obviously aren’t in a position to address what they previously failed to question.  But what happens when Americans suddenly discover their paper money is backed by $17 trillion of accumulated debt, and $70 trillion of future obligations?  (In fact, it is debt-based rather than asset-based money.)

What happens when a foreign country sells off (or totally writes off) what the U.S. owes it (U.S. Treasury Bonds), and the value of the US Dollar plunges in value in the world economy?  That day has been predicted by a U.S. Senator and I’m sure he got his scenario right from the Central Intelligence Agency.

I wonder if Americans will then begin to question any of the other parts of the grand illusion that have been created?

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