The November 5th Peace Bomb

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On November
5, 2007, over 4 million dollars was voluntarily donated to the Ron
Paul for President campaign. This one-day phenomenon was not organized
by campaign headquarters, but was started by one individual supporter.
The word spread in a short time through the Internet to the over
1000 Ron Paul meetup groups.

This one-day
event on November 5th was known as the money bomb and
it was tied to Guy Fawke's Day and also the movie V for Vendetta.
On November 5, 1605, Guy
Fawkes
tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament (although he
failed). This was also the basis of the V
for Vendetta
movie in which November 5th became
a day for revolution.

After this
amazing day of fundraising, the media could not help but take notice.
It sent shockwaves through the establishment, even if they didn't
react that way. There were many news articles and television stories
that covered the event and many of them were fair in their reporting.
But there were also some that were insinuating Ron Paul supporters
as being advocates of violence.

For those that
have tried to tie violence to the Ron Paul revolution, they actually
have it completely backwards. It is mostly only the Ron Paul supporters
that are advocates of peace. It is the supporters of the other candidates
who are advocating violence.

In saying that
the other candidates and their supporters are advocating violence,
many will immediately think of the war issue, particularly the Iraq
War. While this is a major issue with great importance, it is not
the only issue that involves violence. In fact, all of the issues
involve violence as all government is backed by force or the threat
of force.

Mike Gravel
and Dennis Kucinich are generally in agreement with Ron Paul's position
on the Iraq War in that it is a disaster and that we need to end
the U.S. occupation as soon as possible. Unfortunately, Gravel and
Kucinich are advocates of violence, but limiting it mostly to Americans.

What would
a Kucinich administration do if you did not agree with his socialized
health care plan and you refused to participate? What if you didn't
agree with the government educating your children or if you just
didn't want to pay for the "education" of other people's
children? In other words, if you refused to pay your taxes or even
part of your taxes, would a Kucinich administration just let it
go at that?

The most likely
scenario is that a Kucinich administration would fine you and jail
you. If you refused, you would see the guns of the government agents
coming to your door. This is not peace.

Every candidate
wants to grow the government, except for Ron Paul. This translates
to the candidates wanting to initiate more violence than is already
being done. Ron Paul and his supporters are the only ones that would
like to reduce violence.

November 5,
2007 was a day of peace. It was a symbol of people wanting more
peace. The Ron Paul rEVOLution has "love" in it because
it is a revolution of peace. Any Ron Paul supporter that is advocating
violence is only advocating it in response to violence that has
already been initiated against them. But even most Ron Paul supporters
would not agree with a violent overthrow of the government.

It is hopefully
understood by most libertarians that persuading our fellow human
beings of the benefits of liberty is the only way to bring about
real and lasting change. The government will eventually collapse
if a large enough group of people sees the benefits of not having
a federal government.

Lew Rockwell
once
stated
that, "the libertarian revolution will come when
we least expect it, and it will unfold in a way we cannot fully
anticipate." Previous libertarians laid the foundation and
perhaps we are in this revolution now and Ron Paul, along with the
Internet, has just happened to be the catalyst.

November
13, 2007

Geoffrey
Pike [send him mail]
currently resides in Florida. In his spare time, he enjoys sports,
music, investing, and studying libertarianism.

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