7 Things I Am More Concerned About Than a Terrorist Attack

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What I am doing as a result of the new US government terrorist attack alert? Absolutely nothing.

The chance of a terrorist striking me is less than .000,000,0001%. However, there are things I am real concerned about:

1. Walking the streets late at night, for fear of being mugged by desperate, poorly educated public school youth, who are prevented from getting First Step jobs because of minimum wage laws.

2. Obamacare–which will  do nothing but introduce socialism to the medical sector and ultimately result in declining life expectancy in the U.S.

3. The growing surveillance state. Edward Snowden was very correct when he pointed out that what we have is a turnkey tyranny/spying state. The switch hasn’t been turned on in a fashion that impacts most of us, yet. But, it is a switch that can be turned on at any time.

4. Crony capitalist/government deals that suffocate the free market system and put more power in the hands of crony capitalists, who feed more and more off the state.

5. Active operations by government to silence whistleblowers, and other exposers of government activities (See: Bradley Manning, Edward Snowden, Julian Assange), so that it becomes more difficult to understand what the government is up to.

6. Federal Reserve money printing that can explode into very strong inflation at anytime.

7. Federal Reserve money printing which results in a manipulated economy that causes the economy to go into cyclical manic-depressive states.

These are all very real dangers created by the state. When the state warns us of a potential terrorist attack, keep in mind what the state is doing to us on a daily basis–things that have a very real impact on our daily lives. The state is much more threatening to us than the less than  .000,000,0001% chance that we will be directly impacted by a terrorist attack.

Here’s my alert: FEAR THE STATE, IT IS ATTACKING US NOW.

Reprinted with permission from Economic Policy Journal.

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