The Logical Fallacy of Lincolnite Interventionism (a.k.a. “American Exceptionalism”)

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For generations, American military intervention all over the world has not based its authority on the U.S. Constitution but on the political rhetoric of a railroad industry lawyer and lobbyist who suffered from myriad mental illnesses, namely, one Abe Lincoln.  (See the book, Lincoln’s Melancholy, for a description of Abe’s mental illnesses).  Lincoln himself claimed, in essence, that the only meaningful  part of the Declaration of Independence (a declaration of secession from the British empire) were the words “all men are created equal.”   From then on, the state and all of its parasitic minions and propagandists have endlessly made the case that it is Americans’ DUTY to see to it that ALL men everywhere deserve “equal freedom,” usually defined as some kind of “democracy.”  Hence Woodrow Wilson’s insane crusade “to make the world safe for democracy” by entering World War I, and all the never-ending wars “for democracy” since then.   The late Professor Mel Bradford called this “the rhetoric of continuing revolution” in his book, A Better Guide than Reason.  This was one of the most profound but simple statements from any intellectual in the twentieth century.   These jihadist-style American crusades of mass murder go under the rubric of “American exceptionalism,” one of the most arrogant and obnoxious phrases in the American language.

But this “American exceptionalism,” based on Lincolnite “all-men-are-created-equal lingo, is self contradictory.  How can WE be “exceptional” if ALL men — including Americans — are equal?  Equal means equal, does it not?  A more precise slogan would be “all men are created equal except for the statists and imperialists who run the U.S. government.”  This reminds one of how communism was sold in the name of egalitarianism and equality — except for the ruling class of politicians that lived the high life on the backs of the enslaved masses.

 

7:01 am on September 12, 2013
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