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Children’s Risk of Death Increases by 5100% Following Covid-19 Vaccination Compared to Unvaccinated Children According to Official ONS Data

The Office for National Statistics has revealed without realising it that children are up to 52 times more likely to die following Covid-19 vaccination than children who have not had the Covid-19 vaccine.

Back on 20th Dec 21, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) published a dataset containing details on ‘deaths by vaccination status in England’ between 1st Jan and 31st Oct 21.

The dataset contains various tables showing details such as, ‘Monthly age-standardised mortality rates by vaccination status for deaths involving COVID-19’, and ‘Monthly age-standardised mortality rates by vaccination status for non-COVID-19 deaths’.

What the dataset also includes is ‘age-standardised mortality rates by age-group and vaccination status for all deaths’, however they have conveniently left out the data for children, and only included data on age groups over the age of 18.

What they also did in the data they included is bunch all young adults together meaning the rates of death are calculated for 18-39 year-olds, a total of 22 years. But for every other age group the rates of death are calculated for a total of 10 years, with 40-49, 50-59 etc.

However, on table 9 of the ‘Deaths by Vaccination Status’ dataset, the ONS have inadvertently provided enough details on deaths among children and teenagers by vaccination status for us to calculate the mortality rates ourselves, and to put it bluntly, they are horrifying, and make it obvious as to why the ONS chose to exclude children from the mortality rates dataset.

What the ONS have done, as can be seen in the above table, is provide an age standardised mortality rate per 100,000 person-years, rather than per 100,000 population.

The reason for this is that the size of each vaccination status population has been changing all the time, due to the unvaccinated moving into the one-dose category, and the one-dose vaccinated moving into the two-dose vaccinated category throughout the year.

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