The United States of Moloch

Email Print
FacebookTwitterShare

While the First Amendment to the Constitution supposedly prohibits the establishment of a national religion, since 1861 and the days of Abraham Lincoln, the United States has been under such a theocratic regime.

In Bertrand Russell’s A Free Man’s Worship (1903), Moloch is used to describe a particularly savage brand of religion:

The savage, like ourselves, feels the oppression of his impotence before the powers of Nature; but having in himself nothing that he respects more than Power, he is willing to prostrate himself before his gods, without inquiring whether they are worthy of his worship. Pathetic and very terrible is the long history of cruelty and torture, of degradation and human sacrifice, endured in the hope of placating the jealous gods: surely, the trembling believer thinks, when what is most precious has been freely given, their lust for blood must be appeased, and more will not be required. The religion of Moloch — as such creeds may be generically called — is in essence the cringing submission of the slave, who dare not, even in his heart, allow the thought that his master deserves no adulation. Since the independence of ideals is not yet acknowledged, Power may be freely worshipped, and receive an unlimited respect, despite its wanton infliction of pain.

 

10:36 am on July 31, 2013
  • LRC Blog

  • LRC Podcasts