Revenge Porn is “Cyber Rape”? I Argue Not.

Email Print
FacebookTwitterShare

Do not, for a second, ever blame yourself. You are not accountable for your own actions and choices. When your own conscious behaviors and voluntary actions cause you personal distress, you must call upon the state to create a new victim class and enact laws to criminalize those who reaped psychic profits as a result of your actions. That is the credo of the victimology society.

Note this story in the media about so-called “revenge porn.” This term depicts the actions of individuals who make use of consensually obtained nude photos to exploit and inflict personal trauma upon others. Here’s a quote from the article on Fox News:

When Holly Jacobs sent nude photographs of herself to a long-distance boyfriend she loved and trusted, the 23-year-old woman never imagined the horror that would befall her.

In August 2009, less than a year after the pair mutually ended their three-year relationship, Jacobs did a Google search of her name and discovered the naked photos on a so-called “revenge porn” website.

At age 23, Holly chose to place so much trust in her boyfriend that she voluntarily sent him nude photos of herself. Realize that there was no binding commitment to this man – they were a couple in a temporary state of apparent bliss. Upon breaking up, he ex-beau decided to post her naked photos to the web as breakup revenge.

Holly is just another individual who made one bad decision after another, and she is now paying for it due to her inability to assess the overall character of a former lover. The Fox News headline reads as follows: ‘Revenge Porn’ victim devotes life fighting to change nation’s laws. Yes, Holly has taken to fighting for state action to criminalize the use and exploitation of voluntarily received materials on the Internet. Holly is quoted as such:

“This is cyber-rape,” Jacobs, now 30, told FoxNews.com. “It’s all about the guy having control over the woman and exploiting her in a sexual way — the same way real-life rape does that. It violates you over and over again.”

Rape is strictly defined as a crime of force wherein a person or group of persons physically aggresses against another in a very violent action, resulting in physical penetration and bodily harm. In reality, rape is defined by individual countries (or states in the US), but always, the key term is “consent.” Additionally, rape is a physical act, but an act of posting consensually received photos is not invasive or forceful, and this act does not aggress against another individual resulting in bodily harm.

Holly was shocked that Miami police told her “because you are over 18 and you consented, technically they are his property and he can do whatever he wants with them.” For once, the cops are right. Holly created her own dilemma as a result of her injudicious choices. But then there’s this quote:

“At this time, 49 states do little or nothing to stop malicious individuals from endangering lives and reputations by distributing sexually graphic pictures of people without their consent,” said Mary Anne Franks, a professor at University of Miami School of Law. “Both state and federal criminal laws are needed to prevent and address this form of sexual abuse.”

Again, the definition of ‘abuse’ does not jibe with the act of voluntarily sending someone a photo that becomes his or her property to use as that person sees fit. The rest of the article discusses some compelling legal aspects of this issue, however, I stand by my viewpoint that consensual actions that are later deemed to be regretful and therefore injurious to the voluntary actor are not coercive, violent, invasive, or criminal. This guy was a skank to be sure, but being a lowlife human being with no moral compass is not a crime and does not justify a criminal punishment.

10:41 pm on October 1, 2013