No Catcalls, Please. I’m Offended and You Are Violent.

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Once again, the perpetually offended, politically correct, feminist-first crowd has found something to be offended about – shocking I know!

Read the whole article on Yahoo - it’s quite entertaining. Burt’s Bees, a great company that makes all kinds of cool stuff for body & beauty had a product called Vanilla Flame Body Butter wherein the packaging contained this “offensive” statement: “Soak in the moisturizing seductiveness of shea butter and indulge in the scent of vanilla and rice milk. And let the catcalling commence.”

One member of the Perpetually & Collectively Offended Club tweeted, “Catcalling is a violence against women.” So this gal created a petition asking the company to “issue an apology and agree to stop the production of products that legitimize street harassment.” The petition website reads:

Street harassment, commonly referred to as catcalling, is the most common form of gender-based violence globally. Long-term impacts include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and at ihollaback.org, victims report missing school, changing jobs or moving homes to avoid exposure.

So somehow, one miserable and scatterbrained bimbo has managed to take a simple product marketing inscription and turn it into something which magically gives rise to a physical act, which then becomes defined as violence, which then begets depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and therefore we shall witness the ensuing ruination of one’s life. The always-fuming, feminist crowd habitually distorts definitions of otherwise meaningful words and manages to elevate every act deemed to be personally offensive into a criminal act of epic proportions against the entire female gender.

This “street harassment” terminology is a bit misleading, as I have been on the receiving end  - many times – of such harassment that has gone too far for my own comfort. Oftentimes it takes place while I am in my car, but sometimes out on the streets or other public place. It’s not violence – it’s what I deem passive-aggressive behavior from men who do not have a clue about proper social skills. This can be a cultural, behavioral, and/or IQ question, and each situation is to be judged accordingly. In fact, I always get ‘fun’ catcalls all the time. Generally, they are from otherwise friendly men who just want to convey that they find you, or something about you, appealing to their senses.

But a “gaze” or a catcall is not to be equated with violence, which is an act of physical force. Fewer people are starting to take this feminist illogic seriously anymore, thank goodness.

1:50 pm on November 16, 2013