Man Threatens Representative of Extortion Syndicate, Faces 20 Years in Prison

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In their candid moments, IRS officials express unalloyed contempt for the citizens whom they plunder.

Former IRS revenue officer Richard Yancey, in his memoir Confessions of a Tax Collector, recalls that his supervisors routinely employed “the language of war” and dehumanized their victims. One of them ended a profanity-laced tirade by telling Yancey: “Deadbeats – if it were up to me, I’d line ‘em all up against a wall and shoot them.”

The IRS employs the threat – and, on occasion, the practice – of lethal violence to extort wealth from the productive. When he was targeted by the agency, Rhode Island resident Andrew Calcione replied in kind.

An IRS agent left a message on Calcione’s home phone claiming that the former accountant “owed” (one doesn’t legitimately “owe” money to thieves and extortionists) $330,000 in back taxes. Infuriated, Calcione reciprocated by leaving an outraged message on the publicly employed predator describing – in lurid detail – acts of lethal violence he desired to inflict on the tax-feeder and his family.

This was an act of surpassing foolishness. A few minutes later, after his understandable – and entirely justifiable – anger had dissipated, Calcione left a second message describing his harangue as a form of profane performance art for the benefit of his daughter. But the agent, who represents a privileged extortion syndicate, simply could not countenance such impudent speech from a Mundane. He called the police, and Calcione – who should have said nothing beyond “I want an attorney” – made the mistake of talking to them.

As a result, Calcione has been convicted of a species of blasphemy against the Almighty Leviathan and a member of its anointed wealth-extraction caste. On September 11, Calcione will receive a prison sentence of up to 20 years as part of a punitive liturgy that will occur on what has become one of the Regime’s most important high holy days.

All government action is either overt or implicit violence, and the IRS embodies this principle with singular purity.

“Make them cry,” exhorted an IRS instructor during a videotaped training lecture described in James Bovard’s invaluable book Feeling Your Pain. “We don’t give points around here for being good scouts. The word is `enforced.’ If that’s not tattooed on your forehead, or somewhere else, then you need to get it. Enforcement. Seizure and sales. That’s our mind-set…. You’re not out there to take any prisoners. Prisoners are like an installment agreement. They [prisoners] have to be fed and clothed and housed. All that stuff. They’re expensive. We’re not here to do that. If you’ve got an assessment, enforce collection until they come to their knees.”

Former IRS District Chief David Patnoe, who after defecting from the syndicate did penance by representing tax victims in court, recalled in congressional testimony that the agency would routinely engage in “outright illegal behavior.”

“More tax is collected by fear and intimidation than by the law,” Patnoe pointed out. “People are afraid of the IRS.”

Such an agency is best described as a terrorist organization. Until they resign and repent, people employed by it are unfit for civilized company and deserve to be shunned and scorned. There’s no excuse for Calcione to threaten lethal violence against the IRS agent or his family, but assuming that his ill-considered conduct constituted a valid threat it was not substantively different from what the IRS does as a matter of public policy.

3:07 am on May 28, 2014