What are Rope Worms?

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If you’re eating right now, maybe you should set your food aside for a moment. Today’s topic, rope worms, isn’t especially appetizing. While parasite biology is not for the squeamish, the importance of this subject cannot be understated. Rope worm, a newly-discovered intestinal parasite, may be one of the most frightening and most overlooked parasites plaguing human health today.

Rope worm is different from other known parasites, like roundworms and tapeworms, in that they resemble human feces and intestinal lining. Dr. Gubarev and Dr. Volinsky, researchers who first introduced the parasite at the 2013 International Chronic Disease conference, estimate that every human being may be infected with some type of rope worm. [1]

What Are Rope Worms?

Rope parasites are often mistaken for decayed food matter (feces) or intestinal lining. They were discovered following a routine enema cleanse and were tested to contain human DNA. It is estimated that at least one in four people are infected with intestinal parasites. Symptoms vary and include weight gain/loss, headaches, indigestion, rashes, increased cold and flu incidence, and even cancer. [2] [3]

Many theories have been proposed to explain the presence of rope worms in the human intestinal tract.

  • Rope worms may be a biofilm that forms in the intestines.
  • Worms may be the overabundance or accumulation of mucus in the intestinal tract.
  • Candida, an overgrowth of yeast fungus, could be the root cause of rope worms.
  • Rope worms may be a byproduct of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) present in food. Perhaps the altered DNA from GMOs have combined with human intestinal cells and bacteria to form a new life form.

The last theory is perhaps the most alarming, making an organic, all-natural diet a possible protective measure against parasite infections.

Appearance and Function

Mature rope worms can grow over one meter long and have an irregular cylindrical or rope-like shape. Their color is often a dark brown, similar to that of feces. When expelled from the body and exposed to air, they produce a distinct and off-putting odor. Some have speculated that the parasite in rope worm causes the human gut to make a body for it as a vehicle through the intestinal tract, one containing a mixture of parasites and human cells.

Researchers report that mature rope worms affix themselves to the colon wall with the help of suction cup-like bubbles. Food substances have been found in the remains of rope worms, suggesting these parasites may prevent nutrient absorption. Rope worms have also been shown to release toxins in the body as a waste product, further compromising the health of the human host.

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