How Trayvon's Knockout Game Went Bad

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If no one else, WND, the New York Post, and now Fox News have started paying serious attention to an urban pastime known as “the knockout game” or occasionally as “polar bear hunting,” a phenomenon that has caused at least seven deaths and countless serious injuries.

The “polar bear” refers to the invariably white or at least non-black victim of a hunt by a young black male, usually one of a pack of the same. The hunters tend to prey on those who seem vulnerable. This includes old people, women, children, and, most often, clueless male liberals– like the Pittsburgh teacher seen in this video – who have trained themselves not to “profile” young black men even when they approach with malice in their eyes.

White urbanites remain clueless because the mainstream media have chosen not to clue them in. Even when local TV stations cover the incidents, as in the Pittsburgh assault above, they are careful to avoid even hinting at a racial motive.

Said former CBS News correspondent Bernard Goldberg, “The white liberals in the media at places that aren’t covering this are saying, ‘You know what? We don’t want to give any ammo to those white racist conservatives out there (because they equate conservatism with racism anyway), so let’s just make believe this isn’t happening.’ How despicable.”

The media’s collective failure to acknowledge the pervasiveness of the knockout game enabled them to turn would-be knockout king Trayvon Martin into a martyr and his victim, George Zimmerman, into a racist vigilante.

If he had not had an audience, Trayvon Martin would likely have made it back safely to the townhouse where he was staying in Sanford, Florida, that rainy night in February 2012. The knockout game is played for glory. Martin’s audience consisted of one person, the sassy, defiant, plus-sized Rachel Jeantel who talked to Martin by phone throughout the encounter.

The story Jeantel was coached to tell at the trial and in the depositions that preceded it had little contact with reality. In addition to lying about her age and her hospitalization, both of which she was called on, Jeantel told some other obvious mistruths that the defense did not bother countering.

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