‘Large Amounts of Weapons’ May Make you a Gov’t Target, Feds Say

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How many firearms and firearm-related accessories do you own? How much ammo do you have stockpiled?

It’s okay, you don’t really have to tell me, but if it’s a “large amount,” you may find yourself in the crosshairs of the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI.

According to a joint ‘Suspicious Activity Reporting’ (SAR) bulletin issued by both agencies in August, intended to be disseminated to police, fire, EMS and security personnel, possession of “large amounts of weapons, ammunition, explosives, accelerants or explosive precursor chemicals could indicate pre-operational terrorist attack planning or criminal activity.”

As an example, the bulletin pointed to Anders Behring Breivik, the Norway rampage killer who admitted to killing 77 people in shooting and bombing attacks in July 2012. The bulletin stated that Anders “stockpiled approximately 12,000 pounds of precursors, weapons and armor and hid them underground in remote, wooded locations.”

Though, the bulletin makes clear that one doesn’t need to store the arms in a hidden bunker or a remote location, but that they can be “cached” in one’s “home, storage facility or vehicle,” and that the weapons can include anything from “rifles, shotguns, pistols” to “military grade weapons.”

All of this raises questions about how does one define suspicious activity as it relates to weapons possession and when does one report it to the authorities?

Well, the rubric the bulletin gives is that when one (law enforcement officer, fireman, EMS tech or security guard) discovers “unusual amounts of weapons or explosives that would arouse suspicion in a reasonable person” he/she should alert the government.

There are other indicators as well, such as:

Illegal possession of firearms (rifles, shotguns, pistols and military grade firearms) and ammunition.

Possession of explosives such as IEDs (including rockets, grenades, pipe bombs and other homemade explosives) and other destructive devices.

Dangerous objects artfully concealed at security checkpoints or in areas where weapons are not allowed.

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