Gun Review: Ruger’s Tactical Takedown. The Perfect 10/22.

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There is a growing trend in the industry.  More and more companies are making guns with threaded barrels.  Ruger’s been doing it for a while, so it isn’t really news.  But occasionally a company will really nail a design and combine all the right elements into something that seems meant to be.  So it is with the latest 10/22 Takedown.

The gun comes in two variations, now.  The old takedown is a fine gun.  But the new version is even better.  The main difference is the threaded barrel.  But that one addition makes this rifle much more appealing.

Ruger 10 22 Tactical20

The Sturm Ruger 10/22 Takedown T

The tactical Takedown’s overall length is just over three feet.  The barrel is sixteen and a half inches,  The gun has a modest length of pull: a touch over thirteen inches.  It weighs just over four and a half pounds empty.  The stock is synthetic and the barrel is a blued alloy that’s almost black.  The gun ships with one magazine (a ten round box), and it has a section of rail that can be screwed to the top of the receiver.  And it all comes in compact black bag.

10 22 bag1

If I have one gripe about the 10/22 line, it is that the compact gun can’t decide if it is a youth rifle or not.  As much as I love the rifle, and I do love it, I have to get all squished up to shoot the thing.  But I’m tall.  And it still works.  I guess I need to find an aftermarket stock that will let me stretch it out.

Ruger 10 22 Tactical12

The front sight is a tiny brass bead on a ribbed black post.  I’ve always liked the size of it.  It works very well for me.  The back sight has two wings with a notch in the middle.  With the brass bead in the notch, and the notch covering your intended target, the gun is very accurate.

Ruger 10 22 Tactical10

With other 10/22s, the front post is lower.  I have one that is set up to shoot pumpkin-on-a-post, which is my preferred set up for rimfire (as I can see the whole target, and see where the bullet impacts).  But the height of the bead on this rifle is meant to clear a silencer, so that set up is much harder to attain.  As such, the sights end up covering a bit more of the target than I’d like.  But I can live with it.  It will only take more practice for me to get used to it.

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