How to Take Your Money Out of The Bank Without Going to Prison

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The banking industry is in absolute chaos as their criminality is being exposed for the entire world to see.

It is now widely known that the derivatives debt is over $1 quadrillion dollars and some of the rank and file in this country are concerned that their bank accounts, 401Ks, IRAs and pensions will be confiscated by desperate, tier two bankers, who are forestalling the inevitable currency collapse by stealing your money.

The time to have taken your money out of the bank was yesterday. There is very little time before the IMF’s plan to steal 10%, for starters, of all bank accounts in Europe. JPMorgan Chase is banning wire transfers from their bank to foreign banks to prevent American capital flight, which will surely happen as America wakes up to the desperate situation that the banks are in. The bank is also prohibiting any cash withdrawals of $50,000 or more. This past Friday, HSBC (America) followed suit. It is highly likely that all 5 megabanks will enact the same policies in the near future.

Although most Americans are free to leave the country, it is becoming exceedingly difficult for Americans to take their money with them. Preparing for expatriation is a daunting task and I do not believe that most of us have the time or the ability to get our assets out of the country as well as make detailed plans and implement those plans in advance of the coming crash as we attempt to leave the country. Therefore, most of us are going to be forced to adopt an adaptation strategy.

With all that is available to read on this topic, it is mind boggling regarding how few people are preparing to act to preserve what assets they have remaining by removing their money from the bank. Because you have put your money in the bank, you no longer own your money. Taking what was your money out of the bank is no longer a matter of walking up to your friendly teller with a withdrawal slip and the teller cheerfully honors your request and you calmly exit the bank with your money in tow. In fact, your teller is trained to look for certain indicators in any cash withdrawal of any significance.

As you move to withdraw the bulk of your money, there are three federal banking laws that you should be cognizant of:  Cash Transaction Report (CTR), a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) and structuring.

CTRs

Federal law requires that the bank file a report based upon any withdrawal or deposit of $10,000 or more on any single given day.The law was designed to put a damper on money laundering, sophisticated counterfeiting and other federal crimes.

To remain in compliance with the law, financial institutions must obtain personal identification, information about the transaction and the social security number of the person conducting the transaction.

Technically, there is no federal law prohibiting the use of large amounts of cash. However, a CTR must be filed in ALL cases of cash transaction regardless of the reason underlying the transaction.

Before proceeding with the planed withdrawal of your money, I would strongly suggest that you read the following federal guidelines as it relates to CTRs as produced by the The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). All the federal regulations contained in this article are elucidated in this series of federal reports.

Structuring and SAR

There will undoubtedly be some geniuses whose math ability will tell them that all they have to do is to withdraw $9,999.99 and the bank and its protector, the federal government, will be none the wiser. It is not quite that simple. Here are a few examples of structuring violations that one should be aware of:

1. Joe has obtained $15,000 in cash from selling his truck. He knows that if he deposits $15,000 in cash, his financial institution will be required to file a CTR. Instead he deposits $7,500 in cash in the morning with one financial institution employee and comes back to the financial institution later in the day to another employee to deposit the remaining $7,500, hoping to evade the CTR reporting requirement. Joe should have used multiple accounts to conduct this transaction.

2. Sally needs $16,000 in cash to pay for supplies for her arts and crafts business. Sally cashes an $8,000 personal check at a financial institution on a Monday. She subsequently cashes another $8,000 personal check at the bank the following day. Sally is careful to have cashed the two checks on different days and structured the transactions in an attempt to evade the CTR reporting requirement. Sally should have made irregular deposits on staggered days.

3. A married couple, John and Jane, sell a vehicle for $12,000 in cash. To evade the CTR reporting requirement, John and Jane structure their transactions using different accounts. John deposits $8,000 of that money into his and Jane’s joint account in the morning. Later that day, Jane deposits $1,500 into the joint account, then $2,500 into her sister’s account, which is later transferred to John and Jane’s joint account at the same bank. Again, John and Jane should have used multiple banks.

The aggregate total of the three transactions totals more than the $10,000 threshold, therefore, a SAR would be filed by the bank and you would be the subject of a federal investigation as all three of the above cases clearly violate the federal banking laws related to structuring. It is a federal crime to break up transactions into smaller amounts for the purpose of evading the CTR reporting requirement. In these instances, the bank is required to file a SAR which serves to notify the federal government of an individual’s attempt to structure deposits or withdrawals by circumventing the $10,000 reporting requirement.

Structuring transactions to prevent a CTR from being reported can result in imprisonment for not more than five years and/or a fine of up to $250,000. If structuring involves more than $100,000 in a twelve month period or is performed while violating another law of the federal government, the penalty is doubled.

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