Wind Farms are a Breach of Human Rights Says UN. No, Really.

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Over the last year or so, I’ve been getting emails from two campaigners – Irish engineer Pat Swords and Christine Metcalfe, a retired community councillor from Argyllshire – urging me to report on their campaign to have Britain’s and Ireland’s renewable energy policy declared illegalunder the UN’s Aarhus Convention.

I never got round to doing so, not because I didn’t wholeheartedly support them but because I thought: “Naaah. Ain’t never going to happen.”

I mean: how could it possibly? The United Nations, as we know, is the very belly of the beast; the onlie begetter of almost all the world’s most far-reaching and dangerous environmental policies. It was under the auspices of two UN organisations – the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Meteorological Organisation – that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was established. As I report in Watermelons, even as far back as 2004 it was responsible for launching over 60,000 environment projects – each with its crack team of sustainability consultants, conservation biologists and other pseudo-science looters draining the public purse for dubious green causes. Worst of all, the UN is the home of Agenda 21, probably the single most all-encompassingly fascistic policy ever devised. Or, as I describe it in the book:

Agenda 21 effectively puts an end to national sovereignty, abolishes private property, elevates Nature above man and places a host of restrictions on what we’ve come to accept as our most basic freedoms – everything from how, when and where we travel to what we eat.

How could an organisation as corrupt, depraved and enslaved by deep-green ideology possibly do anything to help the little guy against the depradations of Big Green?

Well, it seems I owe Pat Swords and Christine Metcalfe an apology. Like most people I hate saying “sorry”. But on this occasion, I’m overjoyed to have the opportunity.

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