Nazis Offered Peace with the Allies in 1941… But Only if they were Allowed to Invade Russia

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The Nazis attempted to broker a peace offering with Britain – if they were allowed a free path to attack the USSR, a new book has revealed.

Rudolf Hess’s flight to Britain during World War Two to sign a peace deal ordered by Adolf Hitler has long been recorded as a bizarre one man mission to try and reconcile warring West Europe and the Nazis.

But the high-ranking Nazi was actually carrying out orders from the Fuhrer when he flew to Messerschmitt to Scotland in May 1941.

He was to offer the British government a deal that would see Germany pull out of Western Europe – so long as the fascists could attack the USSR without intervention.

But historian Peter Padfield has discovered evidence he claims proves that the deputy Fuhrer held a detailed peace treaty.

It proposed that the Nazis would withdraw from western Europe, in exchange for British neutrality over a planned attack on Russia, the Daily Telegraph reported.

The researcher claims in a new book that a German-speaking unnamed informant told him he was called in to translate the documents that showed Germany wanted a clear path to attack the Soviets within five weeks.

Hess’ mission began with him parachuting out over Renfrewshire where he was arrested by a farmhand with a pitchfork.

The Third Reich deputy wanted to contact the Duke of Hamilton to set peace talks with Winston Churchill in motion.

But despite the offer, Churchill’s morals were not swayed by the offer.

He refused to allow the Third Reich a clear path to attack the Eastern Front – because he did not trust Hitler’s promises and it would have jeopardised his efforts to involve the U.S in the raging war, Mr Padfield says.

The author claims the Prime Minister was determined to beat Hitler and he did not want to destroy a coalition of European governments, so the offer was not made public.

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