Iodine Deficiency: The Public Health Nightmare Continues

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I have been practicing medicine for over 20 years.  During this time, I have seen an astounding rise in the use of prescription drugs and vaccines—both of which have failed to halt the escalation of chronic illnesses that are plaguing the U.S. population.  Here is a list of some of the illnesses that are increasing at epidemic rates: ADHD, autism, autoimmune thyroid disorders including Hashimoto’s and Graves’ disease, as well as cancer of the breast, ovary, uterus, and thyroid.  In fact, one in seven women in the U.S. are suffering from breast cancer while one in three men have prostate cancer.  What does each of these conditions have in common?  The answer is easy; each of these conditions can be caused by iodine deficiency.

Knowing this, it is unbelievable to me that, in 2013, we are still suffering from an epidemic of iodine deficiency.   I have been researching and writing about iodine deficiency for over 12 years.  I, along with my partners, have checked over 6,000 patients for their iodine status and have found that over 95% are deficient in iodine and most are severely deficient.  This is a public health nightmare that is not being recognized by most physicians.  Why is that?  Most physicians have no idea how to properly check for iodine sufficiency and have no knowledge how to supplement their patients with iodine.

This blog post was prompted by the latest statistics on the iodine status of women of pregnancy age released by the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010.(1)   Studying iodine levels in women of pregnancy age is very important because a pregnant woman needs to have adequate amounts of iodine in order for the fetus to develop normally.  It has been known for well over 100 years that children born to iodine deficient mothers can suffer irreversible neurologic problems including cretinism.  Furthermore, insufficient maternal iodine during pregnancy can result in a permanently lowered IQ as well as thyroid problems.

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