The WORST Car Inventions That Never Took off: Magnetic Minibars in The Glovebox, Car Record Players and a Sack That Carried Dogs Outside The Car to Give Them 'Fresh Air'

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Since the 1930s, car makers have experimented with a host of features to give their models a unique selling point. 

Yet some were so weird, and in some cases, dangerous that they never really took off.

This included glovebox minibars that kept tumblers in place using magnets, a steering wheel with a spike that could impale the driver, record players built into the dashboard and a sack that carried dogs alongside the vehicle. 

This collection of bizarre car inventions was put together by car fanatics site Jalopnik.

The magnetic minibar was a standard feature of the 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham. 

Limousines of the time were fitted with bars but the Eldorado Brougham was the first car to have one built-in. 

It featured a magnetised glovebox door and a set of four metal shot tumblers that were designed to stay put when turning corners.

Many of the Chryslers produced between 1956 and 1959 were fitted with a record player. 

The records didn’t last very long because the stylus was designed to press down on them hard to prevent skipping, which damaged the vinyl. 

According to car fan Michael Ballaban, the players used in the Chryslers only played specially designed records, which meant that there wasn’t a huge catalogue of albums to choose from. 

He also said that even with the pressure from the stylus, the tracks would still skip if the car went around a corner or over a pothole.

The Dog Sack invention first appeared in the June 1935 issue of Popular Mechanics.

It was designed to keep the car clean while giving the dog some fresh air. 

According to the original article: ‘When you take your dog along for a ride, but prefer not having it inside the car, it can ride safely and comfortably in this sack, which is carried on the running board.

‘The bottom of the sack is clamped to the running board and the top is fastened to the lower part of an open window with hooks, covered with small rubber tubing to prevent marking the car.’

This invention was never added to any car models.

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, car manufacturers tried to get more people to wear their seatbelts by introducing automatic versions, pictured.

During the late 70s and early 1980s, car manufacturers tried to get more people to wear their seatbelts by introducing automatic versions, pictured. The lap belt would clip on like the modern-day belts and the shoulder belt would be built into a track in the top of the door frame and across the driver

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, car manufacturers tried to get more people to wear their seatbelts by introducing automatic versions.

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