Seven Books Every Sovereign Man Should Read

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Being a sovereign man is not just about diversifying and internationalizing your assets across national borders.

It’s as much about your mindset and the way you view the world and the events that are happening around you.

Your worldview is heavily dependent on the knowledge and ideas that you are exposed to, but as demonstrated some people don’t want to learn, neither from books nor from history.

Take Ben Bernanke for example.

Is it surprising that the economy is on the brink of collapse when he and so called leading economists have based their whole worldview on faulty Keynesian economic theories?

The consequences might be surprising to them, but not to us, because we know better. We’ve learned from history.

Albert Einstein said, that “any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking,” but to make the best use of your brain it helps first having an accurate understanding of reality, and of where the world is heading.

So to that end, here are some books to get you started:

The Road to Serfdom
by Friedrich A. Hayek

The Godfather of the Austrian School of economics, Hayek explains the vitality and necessity of economic freedom better than anything else I’ve read.

Read/Download for free at the Mises Institute

Atlas Shrugged
by Ayn Rand

This book teaches you the basic principles of reward being in proportion to the value you add to other people’s lives. It also helps you to step out of the victim frame and start to realize that nobody else owes you a goddamn thing and you have to build/contribute something that other people want before you have a claim to anything.

Anatomy of the State
by Murray N. Rothbard

You might have heard me mention the concept of reducing your sovereign risk before, i.e. not trusting any one government with your money or your safety. When you diversify to protect yourself against the state, it helps first knowing the true nature of the state. This book will help you with that.

The state is not the same as society, and the state is certainly not “we.” As the book description says, Murray shows “how the state wrecks freedom, destroys civilization, and threatens all lives and property and social well being.”

Read/Download for free at the Mises Institute

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