Health Effects of Harmful Organisms

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Harmful organisms are abundant in the environment and your colon provides the ideal environment to host these dangerous organisms. The fact is there are so many varieties of bacteria and worms and viruses, until it’s really impossible to avoid all of them. Still, there are things that you can watch for to avoid and ways to reduce the number of dangers that assail you constantly. From basic hygiene to lifestyle changes, there are practices that you can renew, be more vigilant about, or implement newly to protect yourself and your family.

Intestinal Invaders

Even in our industrialized culture, we’re not rid of intestinal invaders that infect and infest the intestinal tract. These infestations are harmful and cause a great deal of damage during their stay. Once they reach their destination to dig in, they attach themselves to the lining where they siphon of valuable nutrients and excrete wastes which are very harmful toxins.

Many of these invaders are present without making a big scene. So if you’re thinking that you can’t become infected because you live in a clean, civilized, forward, industrial country, or because you don’t feel anything, consider that it’s estimated that a large number of people are infected with these organisms that feed on vital nutrients – and they don’t even know it.

However, you know you may be infected when you manifest any of the following symptoms.

  • Abdominal Pain

  • Allergies
  • Anemia
  • Chronically Weakened Immune System
  • Colon Cancer
  • Constipation
  • Dermatitis
  • Diarrhea
  • Excess Gas
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Joint Inflammation
  • Muscle Pain
  • Nervousness
  • Sleeping Problems
  • Teeth Grinding
  • Weight Loss

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The infestation of the intestinal invaders can mimic many different illnesses. These invaders, believed to be the root cause of many illnesses, present a particular threat to the intestinal tract when they move in. Along with making the colon impermeable, and sustaining themselves on your vital nutrients, these invaders give back (excrete) harmful toxic waste materials. The list of harmful invaders we’ll review are Giardia, Toxoplasma, Cyclospora, Tapeworms, Roundworks/Pinworms, Hookworms, Trichinella, Intestinal fluke, Liver fluke, Candida, E-Coli, Clostridium, and Salmonella.

Giardia lamblia

This single-celled organism presents and can multiply into the millions before being ejected. They move through the small intestine. The hard protective cyst that forms around the organism and its eggs, interfere with your digestion of lipids, and prevent needed fat-soluble nutrients from being absorbed. The infection it causes is Giardiasis. It is the most common invader and reason for 25% of the diarrhea cases in the United States and is not easily detected. Symptoms of this infection include severe diarrhea, bloating, gas, abdominal cramping, weight loss, greasy bowel movements and dehydration.

The cysts are passed through feces and can live outside a host body for several months where they will lie in wait for their next host either by way of ingestion or contact with fecal matter. Daycare centers and other communal settings are at much higher risk of passing around this organism that lives on feces. Also at risk are: international travelers, people who swim in lakes, streams and rivers, and those who drink feces-contaminated water.

Anatomical Overview

Anatomical Overview of Cyclospora Infestation

Typical sites within the small intestine for Cyclospora infestation.

Interior View

Interior View of Cyclospora Infestation

Colonization by adult organisms occurs rapidly due to multiple asexual reproductive cycles.

Magnified View

Magnified View of Cyclospora Infestation

A single Cyclospora protozoan can lead to full colonization and severe illness.

Toxoplasma gondii

Another single-celled organism, this invader will choose to live in the intestinal tract. The disease it causes is toxoplasmosis. Usually it enters the body in contaminated meat, or when you come in contact with cat feces in the garden or cleaning the litter box. A pregnant woman can pass it on to her unborn child who can develop major disorders of the nervous system, mental retardation, or heart or eye damage.

If this invader is picked up by a healthy person with a strong immune system, then there may be no symptoms. However, the person with a weakened immune system may suffer greatly.

Anatomical Overview

Anatomical Overview of Toxoplasma Infestation

Typical sites within the small intestine for Toxoplasma gondii infestation.

Interior View

Interior View of Toxoplasma Infestation

Colonization occurs with adult organisms creating a health condition known as toxoplasmosis.

Magnified View

Magnified View of Toxoplasma Infestation

Protective cyst encasing a ‘family’ with adult organisms and their eggs.

Cyclopsora cayetanensis

Another common, single-celled organism, cyclopsora cayetanensis infects the bowels. It’s contracted by ingesting contaminated food or water, or contact with feces. They make their way to the intestinal tract. They grow and multiply exponentially. Ultimately, the invaders’ eggs are excreted in the host’s waste.

Symptoms include diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, bloating, gas, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, fever and muscle aches.

Anatomical Overview

Anatomical Overview of Cyclospora Infestation

Typical sites within the small intestine for Cyclospora infestation.

Interior View

Interior View of Cyclospora Infestation

Colonization by adult organisms occurs rapidly due to multiple asexual reproductive cycles.

Magnified View

Magnified View of Cyclospora Infestation

A single Cyclospora protozoan can lead to full colonization and severe illness.

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Worm Colon Invaders

Did You Know?

  • Intestinal worms can survive inside the body for more than 10 years
  • Intestinal worms can grow to more than 30 feet long

Usually they can come from eating under-cooked pork, beef or fish. In the U.S., beef is the most common source because so many of the cows we eat are infested with them from their own food and water being contaminated. The livestock eats the organism which then penetrates the intestinal lining and travels in the bloodstream and finally to the muscle tissue where it then gets eaten by people. In humans, they attach themselves to the intestinal lining where they feed, mature and multiply.

Symptoms of infection include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, nausea, and severe appetite changes. Left unchecked in humans, the damage could spread to other organs and cause diseases such as Cysticercosis, and Alveolar-Hyatid Disease in children.

Roundworms/Pinworms

Did You Know?

  • Roundworms – Most popular on the planet.
  • Pinworms – Most popular in the United States

Did you know that there are more than 20,000 different species of roundworms? Some 15,000 of them live by sucking nutrients from hosts and “over 1.5 billions people are infected with some form of roundworm.”

Pinworms are small white intestinal invaders and it is believed that may specifically target humans. Pinworm eggs move along the small intestine where they hatch and mature. Adult pinworms travel to the colon where they can live for several months.

Symptoms of pinworm infestation include anal itchiness, insomnia, and poor appetite. Because the eggs are laid around the anus and it’s itchy, the re-infestation in children can recur repeatedly when the child scratches and then transfers them to their mouths on unclean hands.

Pinworms can live for as long as two weeks outside the body. And if someone touches a contaminated surface and puts unclean hands in the mouth, it’s very likely they may become infected.

Anatomical Overview

Anatomical Overview of Pinworm Infestation

Typical site within the large intestine for Pinworm infestation. Pinworms also routinely exit the body via the anus.

Interior View

Interior View of Pinworm Infestation

Adult organisms congregate within the host and reproduce in large numbers.

Magnified View

Magnified View of Pinworm Infestation

Pinworms exit the anus at night to lay their eggs. The host scratches the area and transmits them to mouth if hands remain soiled.

Hookworms

These creatures contaminate feces and they can penetrate human skin. For this reason, walking barefoot outdoors in high risk areas poses a serious threat. High risk areas include places known to have been infected and places where animal feces is frequently found. Most infections occur in tropical and subtropical areas.

Hookworms travel to and make their home in the intestine, where they attach with fangs and siphon blood to survive.

Symptoms in of hookworm infestation include stomach pain, loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, bloody stool, gas, itchy skin, fever and fatigue. These organisms can survive as long as 10 years in their hosts. Prolonged infections can lead to serious symptoms such as iron deficiency because of the blood they drink. The infection can also lead to heart problems.

Anatomical Overview

Anatomical Overview of Hookworm Infestation

Typical sites within the small intestine for Hookworm infestation. Hookworms can enter the body by penetrating the skin of the feet.

Interior View

Interior View of Hookworm Infestation

Adult organisms affix to the intestinal lining and can cause illness and conditions such as anemia.

Magnified View

Magnified View of Hookworm Infestation

A Hookworm attaches itself with razor sharp teeth and begins to ingest blood.

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