Cyprus To Keep Banks Shut Into Next Week as It Seeks Deal To Avert Disaster

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Cyprus ordered its banks to remain closed until next week as the cabinet held emergency talks on Wednesday in an effort to strike a deal with the EU or Russia to avert financial meltdown and stave off bankruptcy.

After the country’s parliament rejected a plan to provide €5.8bn (£5bn) by seizing a portion of bank deposits from anyone with a bank account, Cyprus is struggling to come up with a plan that will let it access an EU bailout to stop its banks failing.

The country’s eurozone partners and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are ready to provide €10bn in an emergency bailout if Cyprus comes up with an extra €7bn itself. Most of the bailout money is needed to shore up country’s oversized banking sector, with the rest for government finances.

No clear “plan B” had emerged after meetings between politicians and representatives of European partners and the IMF. The Cypriot cabinet was said to be discussing ideas including the nationalisation of pension funds of semi-government corporations, which hold between €2bn and €3bn, and another form of levy on deposits. Another option debated may have been natural gas bonds linked to hydrocarbon reserves discovered off Cyprus, which remain uncertain and will not be exported until at least 2019.

It was unclear whether European partners would accept the idea of turning to pension fund assets, which could leave the government exposed to further debts.

“We don’t have days or weeks, we have only hours to save our country,” Averof Neophytou, deputy leader of the ruling Democratic Rally party, told reporters as crisis talks in Nicosia dragged on into the evening.

Banks in Cyprus will now not open until Tuesday at the earliest, because Monday is already a scheduled bank holiday. They have been shut since last week to prevent a run on deposits. The country’s two main banks – Laiki and the Bank of Cyprus – face potential failure if a bailout is not secured. One official told the Associated Press that Europe and the IMF were pressing for the two banks to be wound down.

The Cypriot government was said to be considering the possibility of imposing capital controls amid fears that money would flood out of the country once its banks were reopened.

With the EU deal uncertain, Cyprus was set to launch a second day of talks with its ally Russia in Moscow on Thursday over a multibillion-dollar loan. The Cypriot finance minister, Michael Sarris, held inconclusive negotiations with Russian officials, but said he would stay in Moscow “as long as it takes” to reach a deal.

“We had a very good first meeting, very constructive, very honest discussion,” Sarris said after meeting Anton Siluanov, Russia’s finance minister. “We’ve underscored how difficult the situation is.” But he said there were “no offers, nothing concrete”.

With an estimated $31bn (£21bn) held in Cypriot banks by Russian banks, businesses and individuals, as well up to $40bn in loans to Cyprus-registered firms, Russia has been gripped by fear since the crisis began to unfold, with state-run television transmitting rare live reports from outside the Cypriot parliament.

Yet the Kremlin’s reputation for seeking hard assets abroad in exchange for aid prompted speculation that negotiations were dragging as it bargained for stakes in offshore gas fields and Cypriot banks. Gas fields discovered in 2011 could be worth many times Cyprus’s GDP but the exact potential revenue stream is uncertain.

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