Bilderberg 2012: Ken Clarke’s Drive of Shame

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Ken Clarke was the last man out. I’m not surprised he was late up. Britain’s lord chancellor had the beery sheen and aspirin eyes of a man who’d found the closing banquet of Bilderberg 2012 more than usually chillaxing. He looks like he’s been pulled through a hedge fund backwards. I’m not even sure he’s wearing trousers.

Poor Ken. It can’t be easy for him, trying to reconcile being an MP, the minister for justice and a member of Bilderberg’s steering committee. Imagine having interests so conflicted. No wonder if he’s got a sweat on. Plus, he’s trying his best to champion transparency, trumpeting it as "the most effective public inoculation against corruption that any country can have", while refusing to talk about the Bilderberg conference or any of the steering committee meetings.

Back in 1994, Clarke thundered in parliament about "the desirability of greater transparency of decisions on monetary policy", but these days he’s having to thrash it out in private with the heads of the major banks. What a nightmare.

Another tired face belonged to Bassma Kodmani, the head of foreign affairs for the Turkey-based Syrian National Council.

She looks a sad little puppet. I’d have thought she’d look happier, having had the hawks of Bilderberg cluck around her for the weekend, planning her new country. It’s no wonder they’ve taken Bassma under their wing. After all, she spent seven years at the Ford Foundation. She’s "one of them".

Happier than Bassma is Karen Field, a satisfied protester from Baltimore. She befriended an insider from the venue and came away with the hot gossip from the conference. A great deal of heavy flirting and some awkward lip dodging earned her this admission: "We had a load of the hotel staff gathered round a computer in the back office, watching Alex Jones – and they’re all rooting for him." Grinning through gritted teeth at the banksters. It makes you wonder what ended up in the soup. No wonder Ken looks queasy.

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