The Insanity of War Flags Over Graves

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Previously by Roger Young: ‘To Alter or Abolish’ — Questionsfor MyRulers

     

Any state created holiday is accompanied by display of that institution's symbols. Memorial Day in the U.S., when many remember those (at least in the military) that have been consumed or merely abused (but survived) by the beast of war, is one of these holidays where the state's symbols are quite prevalent.

This story, posted back in January, seems to be even more relevant at this time of year. The story tells of a family in Mesquite, TX who want a family member's grave to bear an "American" flag.

Enslaved individual's reverence toward their state master is probably best illustrated by idolization of its symbols and glorification of its acts of mass murder, i.e. wars. Many insist on projecting this demented adoration upon the memorials of loved ones who participated in these acts.

"He could've been killed when he was serving," she [a stepdaughter] said suddenly filled with emotion.

Yes, he very well could have been killed thanks to the state that kidnapped his mind and body and put him in this perilous situation. This fact, alone, should be cause for contempt, not celebration. Why not celebrate the productive life he was able to live, after surviving such threats, rather than dwell on what might have been a tragic, early death?

Why would anyone want this hideous banner, representing slavery and tyranny, flying over a loved one's grave? My father was a WWII draftee/vet/victim who took a German sniper's bullet. For this he received a piece of scrap metal called a "purple heart." When he died, after a long, productive life, some criminal from the U.S. Regime sent me one of these offensive rags. I immediately sent it to the landfill where it belongs.

Mr. Branton was victimized and enslaved by the bloody US regime at the peak of his life. The fact that he "didn't brag" strongly indicates that his horrible experience is a bad memory not worth recalling or remembering. It was a nightmare he wanted to forget- and rightly so. My father talked little about his horrible experience, as well. Why demean his memory by praising and glorifying his oppressor?

"The flag means America to me. It means freedom, defending our country."

How can a symbol that has flown over some of the worst atrocities, genocides, fraud, thievery, and rights abuses in the history of humankind represent "freedom?" Remember, this flag once flew with pride over a "country" whose state protected, with violence if necessary, chattel slavery. It triumphantly accompanied those committing genocide on the American Indian. It flew in exultant glory over each of the scores of U.S. war crimes committed throughout the world. Some of the worst of these crimes were against its own people! It can certainly be argued that war, itself, is a crime. For an activity to be considered a "war crime" indicates a particularly flagrant violation of decency and civilized behavior. And let us not forget the massive political slavery this piece of cloth represents. This symbol is undeniably stained and disgraced by the documented history of a multitude of collective atrocities.

Flying this flag in the name of "freedom" is therefore an egregious hypocrisy. Flying this flag in the name of "liberty" is near criminal naivety. Flying this flag to celebrate "fighting tyranny" is to ignore the authoritarian transgressions of the very state it represents. Flying this flag in the name of "independence" conveniently forgets the millions of minds indoctrinated and subjugated by ideological conformity and barbarous nationalism. It ignores the untold, productive, individual actions that have been outlawed, regulated, taxed, and slandered into non-existence.

You don't defend anyone's "country" when you bleed and die in the state's wars. You defend and advance the depraved ambitions of the ruling regime and the state and corporate oligarchs that control it. Try to remember way back, when a U.S. war actually ended. Was the "country" stronger? Hardly, considering the huge number of corpses, crippled survivors and depleted national wealth. However, the state and its ruling elites remained not only untouched, but wealthier, stronger, and more powerful- all at the expense of the "citizenry."

When the U.S. War Flag flies over a grave, it is a declaration that the soul buried beneath the ground is clear property of the U.S. in perpetuity. It is a proclamation that this soul's most meaningful action in life was killing strangers to accomplish the goals of depraved, power mad psychopaths. It is advertising the idea that consent and slavish obedience to the political order is the highest personal goal for which an individual can achieve and be recognized.

The state's symbols communicate ideas and principles its subjects have been indoctrinated into believing are associated with their ruling state. Considering the mountain of evidence indicating this state does not live up to these virtuous ideals and principles and is not the righteous institution one has been lead to believe, it only makes sense that one would not only end his loyalty to this state but also terminate any reverence and respect for its symbols. His relationship with his state up to now has been revealed as one of deceitful enslavement. This goes for everyone, including family members. Having suffered state slavery and abuse during life, why condemn a loved one to symbolic bondage for eternity?

Roger Young [send him mail] is a freelance photographer in US-occupied Texas and has a blog.

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