Inexpensive Now, Invaluable Late

Email Print
FacebookTwitterShare

Recently by Tess Pennington: The Barter Value of Skills

     

Reality tells us that we may soon be coming to a point in which cash is no longer king. The economy has been drying up for years. Over one million Americans filed their initial unemployment claim over the last month. The dollars we bring home are buying less on every trip to the grocery store.

Few of us are completely self-sufficient. There are always going to be a few things that we cannot make for ourselves. If your personal preps are in order, consider investing your prep dollars in a new way: purchase barter items!

A lot of things that are inexpensive now will be invaluable later. As the economy collapses even further, people will be focused on survival and the barter system will reignite. Barter items will be far better than cash – you can’t eat a dollar!

What kind of items will be worth their weight in gold? Check out this list for a few suggestions:

  • Matches and lighters
  • Seeds
  • Canning jars, lids and rings
  • First aid items
  • Tools
  • Water Filtration Supplies
  • Sewing supplies
  • Vitamins
  • Salt
  • Feminine Hygiene Supplies
  • Vitamins
  • Fishing Supplies
  • Fuel (gasoline, propane, kerosene, etc)
  • Sweeteners such as honey, sugar and syrup
  • Coffee/Tea
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Liquor
  • Cigarettes/tobacco
  • Small packages of food (baggies of beans/rice, etc)
  • Livestock
  • Cooking oil
  • Firewood
  • Farm supplies (pesticides, fertilizer, etc.)
  • Weapons, Ammo*
  • Batteries
  • Warm clothing
  • Hats/Gloves (think about those little dollar store stretchy items)
  • Soap/shampoo
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Dental care items (toothbrushes/toothpaste/floss)

Read the rest of the article

Tess Pennington joined the Dallas chapter of the American Red Cross in 1999 Tess worked as an Armed Forces Emergency Services Center specialist and is well versed in emergency and disaster management and response. You can follow her regular updates on Preparedness, Homesteading, and a host of other topics at ReadyNutrition.com.

The Best of Tess Pennington

Email Print
FacebookTwitterShare