The Necromongers

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The Nazis had the Herrenvolk – the master race. It didn’t work out for them so well. But if they’d been a bit slicker in their thinking, they would have done what we’ve done and touted the master culture – aka, the doctrine of American Exceptionalism.

This is the notion not merely that We’re Number One – but that we are going to make you Number One, too. Everyone the world over is to be transformed – by force, if need be – into a member in good standing of Team Democracy. Which in practice means becoming a satrap of corporate interests, pledging allegiance to becoming the next “company town” in a string of company towns – with the ultimate goal being a world company town. Everything the same. Especially, the same financial institutions and the same system of debt-slavery, with periodic votes as to who will be the new massa – but never a real choice to exit or even fundamentally alter the system.

America is far pushier (though much more subtle) than the Nazis were in this respect. Their policy was – in the West – occupation and control and exploitation.The Nazis allowed the French to remain French, at least in the trivialities. And even in the East, the eventual plan was not to convert the Slavs but to push them aside (or into mass graves, which in some respects might be preferable).

Ours includes these things, too. But there is also the extra needling of conversion. They must become like unto us. C.S. Lewis put it this way:

“Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their consciences.”

The defining characteristic of The United States (singular, post 1865) both externally and internally, is that it never leaves anyone be. It is not enough to leave others alone, to live one’s life in peace. Individually or internationally. One must conform, submit – and obey.

To the Master Culture.

One hears it broadcast daily in the sociopathic narcissism (and solipsism) of our national leaders and leader-aspirants. Obama (and the previous decider) is even more shameless in this way than Dr. Goebbels ever was. Hillary and Rick Santorum and Newtie, too. They may not wear khaki (yet) but their souls are brutally brownshirt. The startling arrogance of our demands that so-and-so “step down” – that “the international community” (that is, the governing clique that controls the US) will not “accept” X (or Y, for that matter). Casual talk of “regime change” . . . in other people’s countries. The even more casual mass killings of amorphous Them in other people’s countries. The serial killer’s utter lack of shame or remorse; the pleasure he takes in his work.

Insolent public declarations about what other countries may and may not do – frosted with the most brazenly hypocritical brayings about “our freedoms” – long since taken away.

And soon, theirs too.

But the true genius of the Master Culture, as opposed to the master race, is its universalism. It is not confined to a region or a people – and so, it is immune to the egalitarian catcall of “racism.” Anyone can join. That is, be forced to join.

All peoples, all cultures are to be subsumed into The One True Culture.

Nazi Germany had built in limits. It was clear – more or less – who was Volksdeutsche. Certainly not blacks and Asians or Indians (India Indians and the American variety) or Mexicans or Arabs or Aborigines. But anyone can be a member of the Exceptional American tribe and thus, a part of the Master Culture. The whole world can be subsumed. No, more than this. The whole world must be subsumed.

Even within its physical borders, American insists on fundamental sameness. On homogeneity of opinion (and range of action) within the bounds of the elaborated orthodoxy. On every town becoming a mirror copy of every other own. Of the same big box stores (aided by crony capitalists via “tax breaks” unavailable to the sole proprietor), the same food, the same McMansions, the same everything – most especially rulers, regulators and laws. Oh, there are minor shades of red and blue here and there – but the theme is the same everywhere and at all times: Collectivism, dressed in a new suit called “democracy.” (A vile form of government those musty dead white men from long-ago warned us about – but who pays attention to them anymore?)

There is a bad sci-movie that articulates the concept excellently. It is called Chronicles of Riddick (sequel to the excellent Pitch Black). It deals with a galactic power called Necromongers. The quest of these Necromongers is conversion. It is their religion. Just before a world is to be assaulted, a “conquest icon” is hurled from space, landing in the capital city of the soon-to-be-enslaved planet. Kind of like the way the US sends its corporations into foreign lands, with or without the consent of the native population. Or even its government.

The Necromongers have a Purifier, too – a Hillary-like official whose job is to make sure the faith is spread. Not by persuasion or appeals to reason. But by force.

Submit – obey.

Necromongers travel from world to world, mercilessly imposing their will and assimilating the populace – who are given the choice: Submit –

Or, die.

Like Exceptional Americans, the Necromongers themselves are not a unique people. Just like Exceptional Americans, they are a diverse people – only, comprised of all the galaxies’ peoples rather than merely the world’s peoples. They replenish their ranks with each new conquest. No one group dominates. It is the idea that’s eternal.

And perhaps, inescapable.

Reprinted with permission from EricPetersAutos.com.

Eric Peters [send him mail] is an automotive columnist and author of Automotive Atrocities and Road Hogs (2011). Visit his website.

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