Yet Another Reminder That Democracy Is an Illusion

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by Simon Black: Why
308,127,404 Americans Are Going To Get Hosed

With over 150
million registered users, the file sharing site MegaUpload.com is
one of the most popular on the Internet. At least, it was.

Yet another
reminder that democracy is an illusion

The site has
now been seized by the US government and its homepage converted
to an FBI anti-piracy warning. Its founder, a high tech entrepreneur
named Kim Dotcom (yes, he had it legally changed), was arrested
in New Zealand after his homes were raided and assets seized.

These actions
were all at the behest of the US government. And it’s just
the latest example of Big Brother overextending its authority across
the entire world.

Last week,
we discussed the grassroots efforts to stop passage of the SOPA/PIPA
legislation that would give the US government jurisdiction over
the Internet. Wikipedia blacked out its English language pages to
raise awareness of the issue, and people went completely nuts.

Congress subsequently
withdrew the bills amid popular outcry, and the public rejoiced
that their efforts successfully thwarted further encroachment on
their liberty. Or so they thought.

On the exact
same day that everyone was celebrating victory over SOPA/PIPA, the
US government simply used another set of regulations to nab Dotcom
and seize his assets. The fact that SOPA was scrapped turned out
to be completely irrelevant, they just found other rules to apply
(or break).

As usual, it’s
probably not legal. But such technicalities don’t matter in
the ‘guilty until proven innocent’ system in which we
live. Executive agencies exercise extreme latitude when confiscating
assets, and victims often don’t have the opportunity to address
the matter in front of a judge for years, if ever.

In Dotcom’s
case, the man probably won’t even successfully make it past
the extradition process for at least a year… let alone bring
the issue to trial. The government is using its bureaucracy to completely
circumvent due process and make an example of somebody that they
consider a nuisance.

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