Einstein, the Electric Universe & Expatriation

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Previously
by Jeff Berwick: The
Fasco-Communist Police State of America

 

 
 

News came out
this week that physicists at CERN, the international nuclear research
facility near Geneva, found that neutrino particles sent on a 500
mile journey got there 60 billionths of a second quicker than the
light speed limit allowed.

What’s 60 billionths
of a second here or there, you ask? Einstein’s 1905 theory of special
relativity says that light travels at a constant speed, regardless
of how fast an observer is traveling, and that nothing in the universe
can go faster than it.

If these particles
truly did outpace light, that would upend physics as we know it.

More importantly,
from my own personal perspective, this news sent me down a dangerous
and time consuming trip into YouTube, Wikipedia and the World Wide
Web that consumed an entire day.

A quick google
search sent me off to some basic physics websites which led me to
some Wikipedia’ing and I finally ended up at a video about the electric
universe.

THE ELECTRIC
UNIVERSE

Ever heard
of the electric universe? I had heard of it in passing numerous
times over the past year. Enough times, and from enough of the type
of people whose opinions I trust, that it had registered somewhere
in my brain to be looked into in the future.

That future
came today. After spending hours tunneling through documents and
information – something that would shock my grade 10 physics teacher
who gave me an F – I was enthralled by this concept of an electric
universe.

More than this
recent discovery in Switzerland, the entire concept that the universe
is electric seems to throw the entire modern concept of cosmology
on its head.

Cosmology seemed
to always be full of holes, literally. Even to my amateur mind.
The sun is a big, nuclear fireball? Black holes that can suck in
and make things disappear only to shoot them out again? Comets made
of ice and dust have a glowing tail? And, still to this day, I’ve
never heard a reasonable explanation for where petrocarbons come
from… or the oceans, for that matter.

Until today.
Again, this is coming from a "F" student in physics (but
Albert Einstein failed his entry exam into university in Switzerland
too) but this theory of an electric universe, which throws on its
head almost all of modern cosmology, makes a lot of sense.

I found the
following video enthralling, especially how it explains mythology
from ancient civilizations.

According
to this article
, if the electric universe theory is true, the
earth may have been a planet of Saturn at one point, when Saturn
was a brown dwarf and this is where it got its water and so-called
"fossil fuels".

ALBERT EINSTEIN

Of course,
any cursory look into physics will have you come across Albert Einstein’s
name almost every other paragraph. So, that led me to the Wikipedia
page on Albert Einstein and to another hour of my day being devoted
to the following excellent documentary on Einstein:

The man simply
has to be one of the most interesting characters of the last century.
It made me wonder, where is the big hollywood movie about him? This
is as interesting of a story as it gets. Genius… changes the way
people view the world dramatically with his mind… pacifist…
divorced his wife, married his cousin… and probably one of the
most recognized faces in the world.

But, wait.
Pacifist? Hollywood, and the US Government propaganda machine, doesn’t
like that. Over
a thousand movies have been made about World War II.
And the
socialist movie about the thief who steals from the terrible rich
to give to the lovable poor, Robin Hood, has been remade and released
almost every single year since 1908 (see
the full list here
). But, a movie about a pacifist genius who
fled from numerous countries and wars? That doesn’t work so well
in Hollywood.

EINSTEIN
THE EXPAT

Here at The
Dollar Vigilante we are big proponents of not thinking of yourself
as being a citizen of a certain state but as being a citizen of
the world. In that sense, Albert Einstein is one of our heroes.
He was born in the Kingdom of Württemberg, part of the German
empire, and then was stateless from 1896 to 1901. In the 19th century
you could still actually be stateless, a most wonderful state of
affairs.

He then became
a citizen of Switzerland from 1901-1911, then to Austria for 2 years
and then became a German citizen again from 1914-1933.

He then fled
Nazi Germany in 1933 and renounced his citizenship and again became
stateless. He was an outspoken war opposer throughout most of his
life and ended up having to make what must have been a terrible
choice. He decided that rather than the Nazis getting atomic power
first, he wrote a letter to US President Roosevelt and urged him
to start a program to create the atom bomb first. A chain of events
that would lead to hundreds of thousands of innocent Japanese civilians
being incinerated.

All the while,
as he fled or expatriated from country to country, dodging world
wars and being ostracized for his opposition to them, he also created
a list of scientific achievements that still shape our lives to
this day.

Quite an amazing
story. You’d think Hollywood would want to tell this amazing tale
of the peaceful scientist who tore up numerous passports and was
stateless twice in his quest for peace and knowledge. If only they
had the time… but it’s been over a year since the last Robin Hood
remake so it’ll have to wait. It is much more important for the
kids of today to hear the important tale of Robin
Hood: The Ghosts of Sherwood 3D
.

Go get ‘em
Robin Hood! Make sure those rich pay their fair share!

Reprinted
with permission from The
Dollar Vigilante
.

September
26, 2011

Jeff
Berwick [send him mail]
is an anarcho-capitalist freedom fighter and Chief Editor of the
libertarian, Austrian economics grounded newsletter, The
Dollar Vigilante
. The Dollar Vigilante focuses on strategies,
investments and expatriation opportunities to survive & prosper
during and after the US dollar collapse.

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