When Will It Be Enough?

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Recently by William Norman Grigg: Stormtroopers and Child-Snatchers

Within the space of about a day, New Jersey experienced two public displays of organized intimidation by paramilitary thugs. The first involved an armed assault by black-clad bullies whose conduct was indistinguishable from the criminal street violence of the Nazi SS. The other was merely a public protest by the local chapter of the National Socialist Movement.

The family of Elsie Wenzel, a beloved school lunch lady who died at age 71, gathered for a memorial service at a funeral home in Hamilton (a small town near Trenton) on April 15. Charles Wenzel, one of her grandsons, “had … something like a seizure,” related Elsie’s widower, Edward, in an interview with The Trentonian. The family called 911 to summon the paramedics. Unfortunately, if you call the paramedics, the police are part of the package deal, whether they’re wanted or not — and they have an unfailing talent for making matters worse.

When Charles had another convulsion, he committed the unpardonable offense of defiling one of the sanctified bully-boys through physical contact. This constitutes “battery on an officer,” and so the offended cop and several of his boyfriends attempted to handcuff Charles while he was lying on the ground receiving medical treatment.

“We didn’t call you for this!” exclaimed a witness as several other people, including a granddaughter of the deceased, tried to intervene to protect Charles from the criminal assault. The officers responded by pepper-spraying the mourners and throwing several of them — including Edward’s middle-aged granddaughter — to the ground. 

One of the officers called in a report that a “riot” was in progress — “riot” being defined as any situation in which Mundanes loudly criticize the anointed purveyors of consecrated violence for their crimes against innocent people. Apparently the funeral parlor was located near a donut shop, because within seconds at least a dozen police vehicles were on the scene. 

One of Elsie’s sons, who was to be a pallbearer at the funeral, was jumped by “seven or eight” of the armed tax-feeders and thrown to the floor of the funeral parlor, Edward Wenzel reported. Another eyewitness who drove by the scene was alarmed to see police swarming four other prone, helpless men.

By one account, at least a half-dozen of the pallbearers were arrested to sent to the hospital as a result of gang violence by the police. When police attempted to “escort” him from the chapel, Edward Wenzel refused; if they had laid hands on the bereaved elderly widower, an authentic riot might well have ensued. 

A day later in nearby Trenton, a battalion-strength contingent of riot police was on hand to provide “security” during a protest staged at the Statehouse by about fifty members of the National Socialist Movement (NSM), a pathetic little outfit that — in terms of authenticity — has the same relationship to the Third Reich that Spinal Tap has to Led Zeppelin

As is typical in events of this kind, the NSM nitwits were outnumbered about three-to-one by counter-protesters. Events of this kind are an orgy of overtime for the unionized gendarme, and the April 16 protest was no exception: Every law enforcement agency — local, state, and federal — sent a contingent of uniformed trough-swillers to strut and preen in riot gear.

The familiar ritual of neo-Nazi protests reminds me a bit of Voltaire’s description of the typical 18th Century Parisian dinner party, where one would experience “the usual unintelligible chatter, witticisms, false rumors, bad reasoning, a little politics, [and] a great deal of slander….” 

Every time neo-Nazi numbskulls conduct a protest, the air will be clotted with the same familiar slogans, the standard assortment of insults will be exchanged, and all of the familiar poses will be struck. 

All of this, I’m convinced, is incidental to the real two-fold purpose of such displays: Allowing the local constabulary to run up overtime, and reinforcing the notion that the police are the valiant protectors of the innocent, rather than the most significant threat to their life, liberty, and property.

It wasn’t neo-Nazis of the NSM variety who disrupted Elsie Wenzel’s funeral. It would be interesting to find out how many of the paladins of public order who pulled “riot duty” in Trenton on Saturday, April 16 had taken part in the police riot in Hamilton on the previous day. In similar fashion, it’s quite likely that nobody who attended Elsie’s funeral had ever been the victim of criminal violence apart from that inflicted on them by the Hamilton police. 

Domesticated neo-Nazi groups like the NSM have a way of Bogarting all of the civic outrage wherever they materialize, including outrage more properly directed at the local branch of the Ordnungspolitzei. This is one reason why the Feds are eager to feed and care for groups such as the NSM — which also act as useful vehicles for federal provocateurs.

The likelihood that the National Socialist Movement — or any similarly situated neo-Nazi group — could become a menace to individual liberty and dignity comparable to that posed by the State’s punitive priesthood is so small that it couldn’t be detected by en electron microscope. Neo-Nazis are almost impossible to find, unless one seeks them out in a few rural habitats in the Northwest and Deep South. The police, by way of contrast, are almost impossible to avoid, and their behavior — as I’ve noted before — increasingly resembles that of an army of occupation. 

In part, this is because many of them are Reservists or Guardsmen who have served in Washington’s military occupations abroad. But even those who have not been deployed overseas are being indoctrinated to think of themselves as combatants in constant peril for whom “officer safety” is the paramount consideration. 

To understand the institutional mindset of contemporary law enforcement, it’s useful to juxtapose video records of two incidents. The first took place in Iraq's Camp Bucca prison in 2005:

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