Government Violence: The Real Evil in the World

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Before I sat
down to write this essay I checked, as I always do every morning,
LewRockwell.com to see
what some of the best columnists on the web had to say about national
and world events. Today, their analysis of the reactions of the
political class and the pundits on talk radio and cable television
to the shootings in Tucson did not disappoint.

Not surprisingly,
law professor Butler
Shafer expressed
my sentiments 100%. There is no need to dissect
the events in Tucson, except to say, the killing of any human being
is a horrific tragedy.

From the murderous
street mugger to the violent carjacker and armed robber, killing
another human being is the highest immoral act an individual can
commit. However, the real evil in the world is the violence perpetrated
by governments around the world, including our own.

As a son of
Holocaust survivors whose parents were the only ones to have lived
through the horror of government-sanctioned mass murder, we as a
people should be more outraged about the thousands of innocent people
in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan who have been killed by our military
as “collateral damage” in the juiced up global war on
terror. In addition, where is the outrage by our political
leaders, the pundits and others about our government invading a
country – Iraq – that made no hostile acts against the
American people?

The Middle
East wars have taken a huge toll. Hundreds of thousands of deaths,
maiming of young American men and women in uniform as well as the
destruction of civilian homes and lives throughout the region and
the borrowing by the federal government of trillions of dollars
to fight wars, are the legacy of our bipartisan foreign policy.

In short, while
we pray for the speedy recovery of the wounded in Tucson and mourn
the deaths of more innocent people gunned down by another delusional
individual, the attacks on public officials is no excuse to shred
the Constitution and take away more of the people’s First and
Second Amendment rights. That is the direction we are headed given
the reaction by both members of the left and right on the political
spectrum.

The violence
of government is all around us, 24/7. From taxation to regulations
to military adventurism, the federal government has become a role
model for individuals prone to violence. If the government can use
violence to achieve its goals, then violence becomes acceptable
in the minds of the unstable. If the government can perpetuate Ponzi
schemes, then some in the financial community will try to create
their own fraudulent investment programs to enrich themselves at
the expense of their fellow citizens.

The role model
for violence is not heated political rhetoric, but the actions
of government officials who assert they are doing “good”
by taxing, spending, regulating, borrowing, debasing the currency
and invading other nations. This is not to condone violence against
any government official. On the contrary, we should criticize
unequivocally their use of violence against the people, while
we work toward reestablishing liberty as the highest social good.

January
12, 2011

Murray
Sabrin, Ph.D. [send him mail],
is professor of finance in the Anisfield School of Business, Ramapo
College of New Jersey.
He is the author of Tax
Free 2000: The Rebirth of American Liberty
. Sabrin is a contributing
columnist for www.politickernj.com
and blogs at www.MurraySabrin.com.

The
Best of Murray Sabrin

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