Elena Kagan, Gun Grabber

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The Chicago
Tribune’s James Oliphant reports:
“According to records at the William J. Clinton Presidential
Library in Little Rock, Ark., she also drafted an executive order
restricting the importation of certain semiautomatic assault rifles.”

When ban was
announced, Clinton staffer Jose Cerda stated, “We are taking
the law and bending it as far as we can to capture a whole new class
of guns.” [Los Angeles Times, Oct. 22, 1997].

The import
ban was made permanent in the spring of 1998. Here’s an explanation
I wrote, as part of an
article
on Rahm Emanuel for America’s 1st Freedom,
which is a NRA member magazine:

In 1998,
Clinton forbade the import of 58 types of firearms and their accessories.
. . .

Emanuel defended
the ban on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, repeatedly claiming that
the banned guns were ‘military weapons, not sporting weapons.’

‘Those
weapons were designed for one purpose – military – and
they don’t belong on our streets,’ he insisted.

Emanuel
asserted that Clinton had banned “the AK-47,” which
was pure nonsense. The AK-47, which is a fully automatic rifle,
was not covered by the import ban. Indeed, not one of the guns
banned was an automatic, nor were any of the guns manufactured
primarily for military use.

All the
banned guns were used in target competitions. Some had names like
“Hunter” or “Sporter.” So how did Clinton
and Emanuel get around the 1986 federal law requiring that imports
must be allowed if the gun is “particularly suitable for
or readily adaptable to sporting purposes”?

Emanuel
argued that it was permissible to ban the guns because [a Treasury
study found that] comments
from hunting guides
showed that the guns were rarely recommended
for hunting trips. As if the only gun that is a “sporting”
gun is one used by people who can afford to take trips with a
professional guide.

Read
the rest of the article

May
13, 2010

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