Be Afraid: The 10 Worst Villains in Children's Books of All Time

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The White
Witch

The
Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

Extraordinarily
beautiful with incredible physical might and an army of fearsome
creatures under her command, Jadis, self-proclaimed Queen of Narnia,
is a royal to be reckoned with. When the arrival of the Pevensie
children threatens the eternal winter she has inflicted on Narnia,
she sets out to find and kill them, turning to stone anyone who
stands in her way.

Lord Voldemort
Harry
Potter

Repeatedly
topping polls of literature and film’s best villains, “the
most evil wizard for hundreds and hundreds of years” is so
feared within the wizarding world that no one dares utter his name,
preferring “He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named”. Seeking eternal
life and ultimate power at any cost, and possessing knowledge of
magic more extensive than any other wizard alive, the Dark Lord
makes a fearsome arch enemy for our half-blood hero.

Miss Trunchbull
Matilda

Locking children
in a spike-lined cupboard called “the Chokey”, swinging
little girls around by their pigtails and forcing one gluttonous
pupil to eat an enormous cake in front of the whole school, Miss
Trunchbull’s tyranny knows no bounds and goes frustratingly
unchecked by disbelieving parents.

Shere Khan
The
Jungle Book

A crippled
but fiercely proud tiger, Shere Khan becomes an instant villain
when he preys on baby Mowgli, who has wandered into the jungle.
Losing Mowgli to the wolves who protect, then adopt him, Shere Khan
vows that the cub will one day be his and launches a 10-year scheme
to overthrow the wolf pack and kill Mowgli.

Cruella
de Vil
One
Hundred and One Dalmatians

Pampered London
heiress turned fur-loving terror, Cruella de Vil more than lives
up to her hellish name, terrorising her henpecked husband, drowning
kittens and kidnapping 97 puppies to make a Dalmatian fur coat.
Said to be partly based on notorious bon vivant Tallulah Bankhead,
Cruella was ranked the No 1 villain in Disney history following
the film company’s 1961 adaptation of Dodie Smith’s novel.

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the rest of the article

April
15, 2010

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