Stephen Hawking: Earth Could Be at Risk of an Invasion By Aliens Living in 'Massive Ships'

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Stephen Hawking
has revealed he strongly believes in aliens and warned that Earth
could be at risk from an invasion.

In a documentary
series, the renowned astrophysicist argued that it is ‘perfectly
rational’ to assume intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe.

And in an extraordinary
series of assertions, he said Earth might be at risk from what he
imagines to be ‘massive ships’ which could try to colonise our planet
and plunder our resources.

Professor Hawking
said: ‘We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent
life might develop into something we wouldn’t want to meet.

‘I imagine
they might exist in massive ships, having used up all the resources
from their home planet.

‘Such advanced
aliens would perhaps become nomads, looking to conquer and colonise
whatever planets they can reach.’

It would be
‘too risky’ to attempt to make contact with alien races, he concluded.

‘If aliens
ever visit us, I think the outcome would be much as when Christopher
Columbus first landed in America, which didn’t turn out very
well for the Native Americans.’

The 68-year-old
eminent scientist has spent three years working on the Discovery
Channel documentary series, Universe, despite being paralysed by
motor neurone disease.

Professor Hawking,
who communicates using a speech synthesizer, re-wrote large parts
of the script and kept a close eye on the filming.

The programmes
use imagined illustrations to explain why he believes in extraterrestrial
life and the forms it could take.

The scientist
said that most alien life is likely to consist of small animals
or microbes in planets, stars or floating in space.

But in one
scene, shoals of fluorescent animals are depicted living under thick
ice on Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons, while flying yellow predators
prey on two-legged herbivores in another.

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the rest of the article

April
29, 2010

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