Ron Paul Things You Want To Know About, But Don't (Yet)

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A diligent Google search has failed to turn up a summer concert tour in promotion of the deep thought of Tommy Thompson or Mitt Romney, or an Internet radio station dedicated to the insight and erudition of Rudy Giuliani or Fred Thompson.

Ron Paul, as usual, is another matter. Here are some recent initiatives that in my opinion deserve to be better known:

Freedom Tour ’08. Musician Marc Scibilia is heading up this 28-city tour, which begins in just a matter of days, promoting the Ron Paul message via music and more. See the brief video here. It’s impossible to imagine this not being a great time.

Revolution By Mail. This project is designed to get Ron Paul’s #1 New York Times bestseller, The Revolution: A Manifesto, into the hands of as many Americans as possible, beginning with GOP delegates and then extending to many other sectors of society. Check it out, and here’s a YouTube.

The creator of Revolution By Mail, whom I do not know personally, intends to turn his attention in the near future to the forthcoming RevolutionBookClub.com, to promote the formation of book clubs all over the country and the world to discuss and learn from the Manifesto, as well as (at some point) other books belonging to the same tradition of thought.

Revolution March. The rally in Washington, D.C. that Dr. Paul called for is taking place on July 12, with the man himself as the keynote speaker. The Freedom Tour concludes with a performance at this event. If you’re even slightly considering attending, go ahead and take the plunge, and bring a bunch of friends. Can you actually imagine not enjoying yourself?

RonPaulRevolutionBook.com. This is a grassroots project to promote The Revolution: A Manifesto. You’ll find lots of things here, including promotional ideas, lower-than-Amazon pricing on bulk orders, and lots of neat merchandise.

Revolution Broadcasting. In addition to its regular programming, this Ron Paul-inspired Internet broadcasting venture has provided live coverage of various Ron Paul events, and now carries the weekly National Ron Paul Conference Call.

I have a new program of my own there, as a matter of fact, which runs on Tuesdays for an hour at 2:00 pm Eastern. (Episodes will be archived here and a podcast feed will go up in the relatively near future.) My first guest will be Bill Kauffman, author of the excellent new book Ain’t My America: The Long, Noble History of Antiwar Conservatism and Middle American Anti-Imperialism. There’s no way that can be dull.

Republican Convention. In this interview with Charles Goyette, Ron Paul calls for a "grand rally" in St. Paul at the time of the Republican Convention. Rand Paul wants to see as many people get to St. Paul as possible. The campaign website will have details soon.

Operation St. Paul. The designer of the High Tide Ron Paul television commercial is proposing that the St. Paul area be blanketed with signs and ads promoting Ron Paul’s message around the time of the Republican Convention in early September. He describes the initiative and the rationale behind it here, where there’s also a ChipIn link for donations. Here are a couple of billboards he has designed for the occasion:

The main idea behind Operation St. Paul is to keep spreading the word about these ideas. What’s more, though, I think it’d just be fun to pull off.

Lots of volunteers have put in countless hours on behalf of all these good causes. Let’s get the word out about them.

Thomas E. Woods, Jr. [view his website; send him mail] is senior fellow in American history at the Ludwig von Mises Institute and the author, most recently, of Sacred Then and Sacred Now: The Return of the Old Latin Mass and 33 Questions About American History You’re Not Supposed to Ask. His other books include How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization (get a free chapter here), The Church and the Market: A Catholic Defense of the Free Economy (first-place winner in the 2006 Templeton Enterprise Awards), and the New York Times bestseller The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History.

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