Nuclear Nut

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When
the parties to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons
meet next month for the 2005 NPT Review Conference you can be sure
that Bonkers Bolton will be there.

Why?
Well, Bolton is the "point man" in the Bush administration’s
campaign to sabotage and/or supersede the existing nuke proliferation-prevention
regime.

At
the 2000 NPT Review Conference, in spite of the fact that both India
and Pakistan – neither country a NPT signatory – had recently
detonated homegrown nukes, the conferees remained "convinced
that universal adherence to the Treaty and full compliance of all
parties with its provisions are the best way to prevent the spread
of nuclear weapons and other nuclear explosive devices."

The
conferees noted "that the overwhelming majority of States entered
into legally binding commitments not to receive, manufacture or
otherwise acquire nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices
in the context, inter alia, of the corresponding legally
binding commitments by the nuclear-weapon States to nuclear disarmament
in accordance with the Treaty."

Legally
binding commitment to disarm? You didn’t know that at the 2000 NPT
Review Conference Bill Clinton somehow got the Brits, French, Chinese
and Russians to join with us in making "an unequivocal undertaking"
to accomplish in the near future "the total elimination
of their nuclear arsenals" as required by Article
VI of the Treaty?

Clinton
must have gone bonkers, himself!

The
conferees went on to reaffirm "that nothing in the Treaty shall
be interpreted as affecting the inalienable right of all the parties
to the Treaty" to the production and use of nuclear energy
for peaceful purposes. "The Conference recognizes that this
right constitutes one of the fundamental objectives of the Treaty."

Now,
in his first State of the Union message, President Bush essentially
accused North Korea, Iran and Iraq of having clandestine nuclear
weapons programs:

"States
like these, and their terrorist allies, constitute an axis of evil,
arming to threaten the peace of the world.

"I
will not wait on events while dangers gather. I will not stand by
as peril draws closer and closer. The United States of America will
not permit the world’s most dangerous regimes to threaten us with
the world’s most destructive weapons."

Bush
didn’t actually accuse North Korea, Iran and Iraq of arming themselves
with nukes. But when you think of a "weapon of mass destruction,"
do you think of Saddam Hussein’s biowarfare "Agent D"
– also known as "wheat smut" – which imparts
to wheat a foul, fishy odor?

Or
do you think of Hiroshima, where approximately a quarter of the
population was killed and a city of approximately 255,000 virtually
destroyed by one nuke?

Obviously,
Bush expected you to think "Hiroshima," not "stinky
wheat."

But,
at the time Bush first made that accusation, North Korea, Iran and
Iraq were NPT signatories in good standing. All of their "declared"
nuclear materials and associated facilities were subject to periodic
inspection by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Obviously,
if Bush was to impose "regime change" on Iraq, Iran and
North Korea on the pretext they had nuke programs undetected by
the IAEA, the IAEA nuke proliferation-prevention regime had to be
discredited or superseded.

So,
Bush announced his own National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass
Destruction in late 2002, and Bolton developed from it the Proliferation
Security Initiative of 2003, whose stated objective was to create
a web of international "counter-proliferation partnerships"
to prevent "proliferators" from "carrying out their
trade in WMD and missile-related technology."

WMD?
Including "wheat smut"?

You
bet.

According
to Bolton, the PSI was necessary because "proliferators and
those facilitating the procurement of deadly capabilities are circumventing
existing laws, treaties and controls against WMD proliferation."

Now,
as Bolton must know, there are no existing laws, treaties and controls
against "wheat smut" proliferation to circumvent.

So
Bolton claims the Bush-Bolton PSI satisfies the implied requirement
of Security Council Resolution 1540, which reaffirmed the UNSC President’s
Statement of 1992, calling for such laws and controls.

But,
Bolton to the contrary, that statement actually includes the following
reaffirmation of the NPT and the role of the IAEA in preventing
nuke proliferation:

"On
nuclear proliferation, they [UNSC members] note the importance of
the decision of many countries to adhere to the Non-Proliferation
Treaty and emphasize the integral role in the implementation of
that Treaty of fully effective IAEA safeguards, as well as the importance
of effective export controls."

So,
keep an eye on Bonkers Bolton at the 2005 NPT Review Conference.
He’ll be fun to watch.

April
25, 2005

Physicist
James Gordon Prather [send
him mail
] has served as a policy-implementing official for national
security-related technical matters in the Federal Energy Agency,
the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Department
of Energy, the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Department
of the Army. Dr. Prather also served as legislative assistant for
national security affairs to U.S. Sen. Henry Bellmon, R-Okla. –
ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee and member of the
Senate Energy Committee and Appropriations Committee. Dr. Prather
had earlier worked as a nuclear weapons physicist at Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory in California and Sandia National Laboratory
in New Mexico.

Gordon
Prather Archives

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