The Story of Two Buses

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Picture
this. You’re driving down the highway with your nine-year-old
son. You’re in the middle lane. On your right, one behind the
other, are two buses. The bus in front is painted white. The bus
behind is painted yellow. The bus in front has its windows painted
over. The bus behind does not.

Your son
asks you a question. "What are those two buses, Daddy?"
You tell him that they are two very different kinds of buses.
"How are they different?" he asks. You explain that
on the first bus are prisoners who are being taken to jail. On
the second bus are students who are being taken to school. "But
how is that different?" your son asks. That’s what I’m asking,
too.

You tell
your son that the men on the first bus are required to get on
that bus. Then your son asks you if the students on the yellow
bus have a choice in the matter. You think about it. Neither group
has any choice in the matter. Somebody tells the members of both
groups that they must get on that bus and stay on that bus until
the bus comes to its destination.

Your son
says he doesn’t understand. So, you try to make it clear to him.
You tell that the people on the white bus have committed crimes.
They are bad people. They are being taken to jail. The people
on the yellow bus are good people. They are being taken to school.
Your son asks: "Why do they make the good people go on the
bus?" That’s what I’m asking, too.

Remember,
you’re talking to a nine-year-old. Nine-year-olds are not very
sophisticated. They
need clear answers. So, you had better be prepared to provide
clear answers.

You tell
your son that the good people on the yellow bus are being taken
to school for their own good. Your son asks if the people on the
white bus are being taken to jail, but not for their own good.
No, you tell him. They are being taken to jail for their own good,
too. Your son asks, "Then what’s the difference?"

The difference
is, you explain to your son, that the people on the white bus
are very bad and society intends to make them better. Your son
asks: "Is society taking the people on the yellow bus to
school in order to make them worse?" No, you tell him. Society
is taking them to school in order to make them better people,
too. "Then what’s the difference?"

The difference
is, you explain to your son, the people on the white bus are dangerous
people. In order to make society safer, society puts them in jail.
The people on the yellow bus are not dangerous. "Then why
are they forced to go to a place where they don’t want to go?"
your son asks. "Because it’s good for them," you answer.
"But isn’t that why the people on the white bus are being
taken to jail?" he asks.

You are getting
frustrated. You tell your son that they’re required to get on
the bus because when they are young they don’t know that it is
a good thing for them to go to school. They
don’t want to go to school. But they’re supposed to go to school.
Your son replies that this sounds just like the people in the
white bus. But they’re supposed to go to jail, you tell him. It’s
for their own good. They’re going to be better people if they
go to jail.

Isn’t that
right? Isn’t the whole idea of sending people to jail to rehabilitate
them? Aren’t they supposed to become better people in jail? I
mean, if they aren’t going to become better people, why not just
sell them into slavery and use the money to pay restitution to
their victims? Why build jails? Why paint buses white?

You tell
your son that the bad people have to go to jail in order to keep
them off the streets. The problem is, this is one of the reasons
why society requires students to go to school. People want keep
the kids off the streets. They want to make certain that somebody
in authority is in a position to tell the children what to do.
They don’t trust the children to make their own decisions. They
also don’t trust the criminals to make their own decisions.

This is more
complicated than you thought. But you keep trying. You explain
to your son that bad people must be kept from doing more bad things.
Your son asks: "What are the bad things that kids do?"
The light comes on. You tell your son that the children are dangerous
to themselves, but the prisoners are dangerous to everybody else.
The children may hurt themselves, but the prisoners may hurt other
people. But your son wants to know why it is that the children
must be taken to a school in order to keep them from hurting themselves,
when they can stay home and not hurt themselves.

You tell
your son that it’s because people are not able to stay home with
their children. Your son wants to know why not. You explain that
both parents have to work to make enough money to live a good
life. This means that somebody has to take care of their children.
Your son wants to know why parents don’t hire somebody to come
into their home and take care of the children. Why don’t they
hire a teacher to take care of them? You explain that it is cheaper
to hire one teacher to look after lots of students. Your son wants
to know why it’s cheaper to send children to school when it costs
money to build schools, buy buses, hire drivers, and pay for gasoline.

This is a
smart kid.

You explain
that the people who have children force people who do not have
children to pay for the schools. Your son asks if this is the
same thing is stealing. "Isn’t that what the people on the
white bus did?" No, you explain, it’s not stealing. Your
son asks, "How is it different?" Now you have a problem.
You have to explain the difference between taking money from someone
to benefit yourself as a private citizen, which is what a criminal
does, and taking money from someone to benefit yourself as a voter.
This is not so easy to explain.

You explain
to your son that when you vote to take money away from someone
so that you can educate your child, this is different from sticking
a gun into somebody’s stomach and telling him that he has to turn
over his money to you. Your son that asks if it would be all right
to stick a gun in somebody’s stomach if you intended to use the
money to educate your child. No, you explain, it’s not the same.
When you tell someone that he has to educate your child in a school
run by the government it’s legal. When you tell somebody that
he has to educate your child in a private school, where parents
pay directly to hire teachers, it’s illegal.

Your son
then asks you if it’s all right to take money from other people
just so long as you hand over to the government the money to do
the things that you want the government to do. You explain that
this is correct. "But what if other people don’t think that
the government ought to be doing these things?" You explain
that people don’t have the right to tell the government not to
do these things unless they can get more than half of the voters
to tell the government to stop doing them. Your son sees the logic
of this. He asks you: "Are the people in the white bus being
taken to jail because there were not enough of them to win the
election?" You know this can’t be right, but it’s hard to
say why it’s wrong.

Here is where
you are so far. Society makes the prisoners go to jail. It sees
these prisoners as dangerous. It wants to teach them to obey.
Society makes children go to school. It sees these children as
dangerous to themselves. It wants to teach them to obey. If it
can teach both groups how to obey, society expects the world to
improve. Society therefore uses tax money to pay for the operation
of jails and schools. This includes paying for buses. But there
is a difference. Prison buses are white. School buses are yellow.

There must
be more to it than this.

So, you keep
trying. Schools are run by the government to teach children how
to make a living. Jails are run by the government to teach people
how to stop stealing. Here is a major difference. "Do they
teach prisoners how to make a good living?" your son asks.
No, you tell him. The prison teaches them to obey. He asks: "Then
why will they stop stealing when they get out of prison, if they
don’t know how to make a good living." Because, you explain,
they will be afraid to do bad things any more. Your son asks if
people in prison learn how to do bad things in prison. You admit
that they do. "So," he asks, "we send people to
prison and school so that they will learn how to make a good living?
Only the difference is, the government pays for a place where
bad people teach other bad people how to steal without getting
caught, but in school, the government pays good people to teach
children how to be good citizens and vote. So, the bad people
learn how to steal from the good people without voting, and the
good people learn how to steal from each other by voting. Is that
how it works?"

That’s how
it works. Both systems use buses to take the students to school.
But the colors are different.

In prison,
prisoners sell illegal drugs. Students do the same in school.
In prison, the food is terrible. It’s not very good in school — possibly
prepared by the same food service company. In prison, there are
constant inspections. Guards keep taking roll to make sure everyone
is present and accounted for. Teachers do the same in school.
In prison, you aren’t allowed to leave without permission. The
same is true in school. In prison, bullies run the show. In school,
they do, too. But there is a difference. Prison buses are white.
School buses are yellow.

This is too
extreme. The systems are different. Criminals are convicted in
a court of law before they are sent to jail. Students, in contrast,
are innocent. Some prisoners can get parole. The average term
in prison for murder is under ten years. Students are put into
the school system for twelve years. There is no parole.

Be thankful
you are not in one of those buses. Either color.

May
28, 2004

Gary
North [send him mail]
is the author of Mises
on Money
. Visit http://www.freebooks.com.
For a free subscription to Gary North’s newsletter on gold, click
here
.

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