More Questions for Secretary Rumsfeld

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U.S.
Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld has given the American people
a clear view of the current U.S. foreign policy. For that, we should
be extremely grateful to the concerned citizen who leaked the now
infamous, memo. If only more information would be provided to the
American people, we might be a little better off. What we need is
a new awakening of the populace where a greater number of people
begin to realize the extent of malfeasance in every quasi-socialist
government action. We must examine anew our foreign policy, our
monetary policy, and the rules and regulations concerned with resource
utilization, commercial exchange, and banking. A careful look must
be taken at our total expenditures and our current sources of revenue.
We would be best served by an educational cost-benefit analysis,
as well as an insistence that "free trade" is really free
trade. And thus, we have a long way to go.

We
must begin with our foreign policy where I have a few more questions
for Mr. Rumsfeld:

Can
we get confirmation on how many "private" foundations
the USG has created?

Can
we get a national referendum on the "long, hard slog"
ahead?

Is
the USG response to everything and anything that may arise to create
a "new institution"?

Great
new slogan for the USG? "The harder we work, the behinder we
get."

"Cost
of billions"…but "we are just getting started,"
and have not "yet made truly bold moves"…uh oh.

"Have
we fashioned the right mix of rewards, amnesty, protection and confidence
in the US?" Our heavy artillery in the war against terror?

"Sensible,
logical moves in the right direction." Yup, that's dear old
Uncle Sam.

New
standard of assessment in Terror war? "Are we capturing, killing
or deterring and dissuading more terrorists every day than the madrassas
and the radical clerics are recruiting, training and deploying against
us?" No, in fact, you are increasing the number and radical
component with every "sensible, logical move."

Lew
Rockwell recently hit the nail on the top of the head. "Here
we have the Secretary of Defense admitting that he doesn't know
if the US government is winning or losing the war on terror, and,
more pointedly, admitting that u2018we lack the metrics' to know. u2018Is
our current situation such that the harder we work, the behinder
we get?' There you have it: a typical government program. Hundreds
of billions down the drain, and nothing to show for it but confusion."
Later in the memo, Rumsfeld asks "Do we need a new organization?"
Rockwell concludes, "in a word, yes, and it shouldn't be government."

I
hope, at the very least, the troops are enjoying their Hershey Pies
over at the Burger King in the Baghdad airport. It's the only sweet
taste in sight.

If
Secretary Rumsfeld's memo is the depth of thought, the height of
thinking outside the box, and the best the USG can offer, I have
a few more questions for the secretary and his boss…

Is
our every action and reaction causing an increase in terror activity?

Is
the private production of defense the best route for completing
our goals of security?

Could
the money being spent best put toward another use? With less drastic
consequences? Would the money remaining in the pocket of the taxpayer
be the best outcome?

Can
the American people protect themselves? Don't they anyway?

Aren't
the police nothing but lousy investigators ex post crime? When was
the last time you heard of a policeman preventing an actual crime?
In the best case, aren't they just a mechanism for revenue collection
and an unnecessary interference in the lives of citizens, who for
the most part, are minding their own business?

Does
the money and military arsenal we provide to nations around the
world have anything to do with our current instability?

Does
the confusion and complexity of our system of laws and regulations
correlate with the increased lack of respect for morality and differentiation
between right and wrong?

When
these questions are answered, perhaps I would have a greater appreciation
for our system of governance.

November
1, 2003

Justin
Ptak [send him mail] is Managing
Editor of Aubrey Herbert's
Economic Education
.


        
        

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