Where African-Americans Rank

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I know you have heard all you want to hear about "reparations" and the "legacy of slavery." However, I have a final point to make and I promise I will be brief. In fact, what follows is primarily a list; a list that will make my point for me.

Economists gauge the wealth of countries by converting such things as income, purchasing power, consumption spending and standard of living into comparable dollars. This produces a common yardstick by which one country’s wealth can be measured against the wealth of another country.

It has been estimated that, if you take the wealth, based on the above criteria, of all African Americans and put it together, they would constitute one of the wealthiest countries in the world. The usual rankings place African Americans anywhere from the 11th to the 15th wealthiest country. Let’s split the difference and make this hypothetical nation — African Americans — the 13th wealthiest nation.

The 2003 World Almanac compiled a list of the 40 wealthiest nations ranked in order of wealth, If we insert our hypothetical nation — African Americans — into its proper place, we will have the following ranking.

  1. United States
  2. China
  3. Japan
  4. India
  5. Germany
  6. France
  7. United Kingdom
  8. Italy
  9. Brazil
  10. Russia
  11. Mexico
  12. Canada
  13. African Americans
  14. South Korea
  15. Spain
  16. Indonesia
  17. Australia
  18. Argentina
  19. Turkey
  20. Iran
  21. Netherlands
  22. South Africa
  23. Thailand
  24. Taiwan
  25. Poland
  26. Philippines
  27. Pakistan
  28. Belgium
  29. Egypt
  30. Columbia
  31. Saudi Arabia
  32. Bangladesh
  33. Switzerland
  34. Austria
  35. Sweden
  36. Ukraine
  37. Malaysia
  38. Greece
  39. Algeria
  40. Portugal

This listing graphically illustrates the true legacy of slavery and it should put an end to any further discussions of reparations.

Gail Jarvis [send him mail], a CPA living in Beaufort, SC, is an advocate of the voluntary union of states established by the founders.

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