Are The Better Days Behind Us?

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There
was a time when men of real stature occasionally showed up in Washington.
Men with the courage of conviction, who believed in the principals
upon which our nation was founded. The War of Northern Aggression
fixed that.

One
such man was named John Cabell Breckenridge who served as US Senator
and Attorney General. When war loomed, and the great usurper, Lincoln,
prepared to send his armies against us, Breckenridge issued a manifesto
to the people of Kentucky, his home state. It contained this remarkably
prescient sentence:

"The
Federal government – the creature — has set itself above the creator…A
subservient congress ratifies the usurpations of the president and
proceeds to complete the destruction of the constitution."

Then
Breckenridge took off his business suit and put on a gray uniform;
by the end of the conflict he was Secretary of War under Jefferson
Davis. Does he sound like a man who went to war to defend his stance
on slavery? Hardly. Yet that is the nonsense that we, his descendents,
are being taught in the public schools.

Jefferson
Davis was another such man — vilified now days by lesser men, he
was that last of a dead breed, the reluctant politician. He took
over the reins of the Southern government because it was thrust
upon him, and he was a man who understood the word "duty."
Yet his dream would have been to don a uniform and serve in the
forces.

In
the wonderful utopia that is modern America, our leaders spend money
by the bucketful for the dubious honor of "serving" us
in Washington. The era of the reluctant civil servant is well behind
us. How is it that we have an election and our choices are so rigorously
restricted to feeble, weasly non entities? Could it be that such
men are best suited to serve an electorate such as we? Perhaps.

Another
possibility is more ominous. As we have moved away from Christ,
who as we know from Isaiah and the Gospels came as a suffering servant,
and performed the duty His Father had set before Him and sought
nothing for Himself. Once, our leaders modeled themselves after
our Savior — now they model themselves after the enemy of man, and
seek only their own venal interests. They are propelled into power
by an electorate to whom pandering is a tactic that is always well
received, for we are of the same scant substance as the leaders
we elect. Mr. Gore for instance, makes no pretence about it and
calls his religion a mere "faith tradition," as if Christ
were somehow in the same category as the "Great White Buffalo"
or Santa Claus.

General
Breckenridge, as if visualizing the electorate of our tawdry age,
commented on the northerners of his day: "…they eagerly offer
to the government what no European monarch would dare to demand.
The president and his generals are unable to pick up the liberties
of the people as rapidly as they are thrown at their feet."
Does that sound like anybody you know? Free prescription drugs anyone?
Take my guns, please! Protect me, feel my pain, entertain me, indulge
my perversions, and I will serve you willingly.

So
what if you make a mockery of the ideals I once believed in, and
of my ancestors who fought for those ideals. Who fought and lost.
For of whom in American history can we say, "they fought and
won a war for freedom." Many of us long for the tender hand
of George III, whose tax burden was so ridiculously light that modern
day taxpayers would have dubbed him "George the Just!"

Americans
who despaired under the tyrannical rule of the British had no idea
how it was to really feel a taste of the lash. What would Washington
and Jefferson have said to a government which forbade them to grow
hemp on their farms (which they did)? Their farms could have been
confiscated and their children murdered under the auspices of our
modern government's so called "drug war." What would free
blacks (there were many more than our modern propagandists would
have us believe) have felt about having half their children in jail?
What would any colonist have felt about having evolutionary theory
and homosexual activism forced on the children in government propaganda
centers they have the cheek to refer to as "schools?"
We can have a pretty good clue what would have happened to a teacher
that usurped the parents authority in the matter of sex education
because it would have started with tar and feathers and may well
have ended with a noose.

Finally,
it is quite obvious what our early American forbears would have
said to gun control, because we know darn well what they did say.
Because that is exactly what Lexington / Concord was all about.
The national government sent troops to confiscate the guns and ammunition
that belonged to the locals, and for their pains they were shot
to pieces by outraged colonials. In contrast, our modern American
citizenry cheered loudly as government troops slaughtered their
brothers at Waco, for the specious crime of being out of the mainstream.

Are
there so few Americans can left who care about liberty? May God
grant that there are enough to keep the flame smoldering because
frankly, it looks pretty grim at this point.

November
11, 2000

Mr.
Peirce fought with the Rhodesian freedom fighters (the Ian Smith
side, of course).

Michael
Peirce Archives

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